Fonds ID1104 - Bliss family

Title proper

Bliss family

General material designation

  • Textual record

Parallel title

Other title information

Title statements of responsibility

Title notes

  • Source of title proper: Title based on contents.

Level of description

Fonds

Reference code

CA MNBM ID1104

Edition statement

Edition statement of responsibility

Statement of scale (cartographic)

Statement of projection (cartographic)

Statement of coordinates (cartographic)

Statement of scale (architectural)

Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Date(s)

  • 1790 - 1893 (Creation)
    Creator
    Bliss (family)

Physical description

3 cm of textual records

Title proper of publisher's series

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Name of creator

(Branch begins in 1742)

Biographical history

Jonathan Bliss (1742-1822), a lawyer from Massachusetts, was appointed Attorney-General of New Brunswick in 1785 and Chief Justice of New Brunswick in 1809. From 1791 to 1801 he was the business advisor of Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who lived in Saint John from about 1786 until he returned to England in 1791.

Jonathan Bliss was born in Springfield, Mass., the son of Rev. Samuel Bliss (1750-1803). He graduated from Harvard in 1763 and lived in Concord, Mass. He was a member of the General Court of Massachusetts in 1768 and was banished from the state in 1778. He was granted a townlot at Carleton in 1785 and became a Freeman of Saint John, New Brunswick, in 1785. He was admitted as an Esquire. He was appointed Attorney General of N.B. in 1784, was a member of the House of Assembly for St. John County in 1786, the Chief Justice for N.B. from 1808 to 1822 and President of the Privy Council. He died in Fredericton in 1822 and buried in the Old Burial Ground. His first wife, Mary, the daughter of the Hon. John Worthington of Springfield, Mass., died in Saint John in 1799, aged 39. His second wife was Sally, daughter of the Hon. Judge Upham. His children include: John Worthington (1791-1810); Lewis (1793-1882); William (1795-1874); and Henry (1797-1873).

His third son, William Blowers Bliss, married Sarah Ann Anderson, the adopted daughter of the Hon. Sampson Blowers, Chief Justice of Nova Scotia. Sampson Blowers was a good friend of Jonathan Bliss and the two had graduated from Harvard together in 1763. William Blowers Bliss was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia in 1834. William and Sarah's children were: Elizabeth Ann (1824-1901), who married the Hon. William Odell (1811-1891); Mary, who married the Rev. Hibbert Binney; another daugther, who married Bishop Kelly; and two sons.

Jonathan's son Henry Bliss was a lawyer and author in London, England.

Jonathan's son Lewis Bliss presented a chancel window to Trinity Church in 1880 as a memorial to the Bliss family.

Sources:
New Brunswick Loyalists, 1983;
Some Loyalists and Others, 1976;
Graves fonds, political biographies, 1960s

Name of creator

(1742 - 1822)

Biographical history

Jonathan Bliss (1742-1822), a lawyer from Massachusetts, was appointed Attorney-General of New Brunswick in 1785 and Chief Justice of New Brunswick in 1809. From 1791 to 1801 he was the business advisor of Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who lived in Saint John from about 1786 until he returned to England in 1791.

Jonathan Bliss was born in Springfield, M.A., the son of Rev. Samuel Bliss (1750-1803). He graduated from Harvard in 1763 and lived in Concord, M.A. He was a member of the General Court of Massachusetts in 1768 and was banished from the state in 1778. He was granted a townlot at Carleton in 1785 and became a Freeman of Saint John, New Brunswick, in 1785. He was admitted as an Esquire. He was appointed Attorney General of N.B. in 1784, was a member of the House of Assembly for St. John County in 1786, the Chief Justice for N.B. from 1808 to 1822 and President of the Privy Council. He died in Fredericton in 1822 and buried in the Old Burial Ground. His first wife, Mary, the daughter of the Hon. John Worthington of Springfield, M.A., died in Saint John in 1799, aged 39. His second wife was Sally, daughter of the Hon. Judge Upham. His children include: John Worthington (1791-1810); Lewis (1793-1882); William (1795-1874); and Henry (1797-1873).

His third son, William Blowers Bliss, married Sarah Ann Anderson, the adopted daughter of the Hon. Sampson Blowers, Chief Justice of Nova Scotia. Sampson Blowers was a good friend of Jonathan Bliss and the two had graduated from Harvard together in 1763. William Blowers Bliss was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia in 1834. William and Sarah's children were: Elizabeth Ann (1824-1901), who married the Hon. William Odell (1811-1891); Mary, who married the Rev. Hibbert Binney; another daugther, who married Bishop Kelly; and two sons.

Jonathan's son Henry Bliss was a lawyer and author in London, England.

Jonathan's son Lewis Bliss presented a chancel window to Trinity Church in 1880 as a memorial to the Bliss family.

Sources:
New Brunswick Loyalists, 1983;
Some Loyalists and Others, 1976;
Graves fonds, political biographies, 1960s

Name of creator

(1795 - 1874)

Biographical history

Custodial history

This fonds was separated from the Odell fonds

Scope and content

This fonds includes correspondence and legal documents of Jonathan Bliss, 1790-1822. There is also correspondence and other material of William Bowers Bliss (1834-1863).

Physical condition

Immediate source of acquisition

Acquired from Mrs. Kingsley Hume 9/7/53; Estate Sale in Halifax of Mary K. Odell

Arrangement

Language of material

  • English

Script of material

Location of originals

S 35 - 6
Microfilm available on interlibrary loan

Availability of other formats

Restrictions on access

No restrictions

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Finding aids

Detailed inventory available

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