Showing 22 results

Authority record
Provinces and Territories (Canada)

C.W. Fawcett

  • MC-72
  • Person
  • 1910

Charles Wetmore (C.W.) Fawcett was born on June 6, 1874, in Sackville, New Brunswick, to Charles and Catherine (Wetmore). He married Mary Medina Chapman on January 27, 1909, in Westmorland, New Brunswick and they had four children. He died on February 16, 1954, at the age of 79. His father Charles Fawcett founded the Charles Fawcett Manufacturing Company in Sackville, New Brunswick in 1852. Long known as the Fawcett Foundry, the company was renamed Enamel & Heating Ltd. in 1928 after the acquisition of foundries in Amherst, Nova Scotia and Victoria, British Columbia. The foundry in Sackville became known as Plant #1, but was still known locally as the Fawcett Foundry. They manufactured a wide variety of stoves, furnaces, and hot water heaters. When C.W. Fawcett’s father died in 1907, he and his brother Horace took over responsibility as President and Vice President of the company, with C.W. Fawcett holding the latter position.

Burwash Robinson General Store and Tannery

  • MC-70
  • Corporate body
  • circa 1902 to 1960s

Alfred Burwash Robinson was born on August 6, 1874, in Shediac, New Brunswick, to John Mathias Robinson (1823-1887) and Jane Amos (1838-1912). He died in 1969 in Sackville, New Brunswick. He is buried next to his wife Margaret I. Cook (1871-1939) at the Four Corners Upper Sackville Cemetery.
Burwash opened a general store in 1902-1903, adding a post office at the same location shortly afterwards. Burwash lived nearby in a small house near Harper Lane (now 352 Main Street, Middle Sackville) and was assisted by his son-in-law George Creasy. He operated a grocery store in 1927 and owned and operated a tannery, but the dates of operation for this latter business are uncertain. The tannery was located on Donald Harper Lane. All of Burwash’s businesses were located in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. Although it is unknown how long Burwash operated the general store and post office, it is known that in the 1950’s Burwash’s son-in-law George Creasy was the chief operator. The vacant Burwash Robinson General Store and Post Office building was torn down in 2004.

Grand Division of the Sons of Temperance Midgic, New Brunswick

  • MC-69
  • Corporate body
  • 1910

The Temperance movement formed to make the consumption of alcohol illegal. The Canada Temperance Act (Scott Act) of 1878 gave local governments the option to ban the sale of alcohol. The Cookeville-Midgic Women's Institute Hall in Midgic, New Brunswick, is believed to have been a Temperance meeting place. Midgic, is a rural community just north of Sackville in Westmorland County, New Brunswick, Canada.

Marion Carter

  • MC-62
  • Person
  • 1928-Living

Marion Carter was born in 1928 in Frosty Hollow, New Brunswick (just outside of Sackville), the first of three daughters. She lived on her family’s farm until she moved to Kirk Street in Sackville, New Brunswick on October 31, 1988. She attended Frosty Hollow School until grade 8, after which she attended Allison High School in Sackville. After graduation, Marion attended the Secretarial program at Mount Allison’s Commercial College. Upon completion, on June 28th, 1945, she began working as a secretary in payroll and purchasing under President Frederick Fisher at the Enterprise Foundry in Sackville, New Brunswick. Marion eventually headed this department. In 1976, she became head of the Personnel Department which had originally been handled by the Payroll department. Marion worked with many personnel at the foundry over her career (which at its height had over 400 employees) and due to the nature of her positions she knew all of the employee’s names. Her duties included sitting in on the negotiations of contracts between the foundry’s lawyer and the union leaders. When the Enterprise Foundry went into receivership for the second time in 1983, she went to work at Lockwood for the last ten years of her career and retired in 1993.

Intercolonial Railway

  • MC-59
  • Corporate body
  • 1872-1918

The Intercolonial Railway (ICR) was the first infrastructure project of the Dominion of Canada and linked Nova Scotia and New Brunswick to Upper and Lower Canada fulfilling a demand of the Maritime provinces to join Confederation. The first ICR train arrived at the Sackville, New Brunswick station on December 2, 1869, although the entire government owned rail system was not completed until 1872. The ICR moved goods, mail, and passengers between the many new towns and cities and gave the central provinces access to the seaboard and opened the larger interior markets to the Maritimes. In 1919 the Canadian government combined the ICR with five other railways making it into one national company, the Canadian National Railway.

George Rogers

  • MC-56
  • Person
  • 1867-1952

George Leban Rogers was born December 16, 1867 in Westcock, New Brunswick to John Rogers, who had emigrated from Scotland, and his wife Emily Lawrence. George was christened at St. Anne's Anglican Church, British Settlement, New Brunswick. From his early teens through his adulthood he lived on the shores of Morice’s Mill Pond, later known as Silver Lake, in Sackville, New Brunswick. George married his first wife Priscella Estabrooks on February 26, 1890. Priscella was born on September 14, 1872, and died in 1905 at 33 years of age. Together, they had seven children: Norman, George W., Marguerita, Hazel, John “Jack”, Clinton “Ted”, Picard “Pick” Hamilton, and Charles B. In 1902, the family moved to the old Beal residence located on the edge of Morice’s Mill Pond (Silver Lake). George continued to live in the house for the rest of his life with his youngest son Abner G. Rogers. After Priscella died in 1905, George was left with seven children, but two years later, he married Flossie Estabrooks (Priscella’s younger sister) on April 24, 1907. George and Flossie had five children together: Edith P., Dexter C., Herman, Donald F., and Abner G.. Flossie died in 1944 after she was hit by a truck in Middle Sackville. George worked for 64 years at the Campbell Carriage Factory as a master wheelwright, wagon, carriage, and sleigh manufacturer in Sackville, New Brunswick. He first appears on the payroll of the Carriage Factory on December 1, 1884, shortly before he turned 17 and continued to work at the Carriage Factory until his 81st year and was one of the factory’s last two employees. George temporarily left the factory in 1916 to enlist in the 145th Regiment in Moncton, New Brunswick. He served overseas in the latter part of WWI with his sons, Jack and Clinton in the 145th Battalion, while his other son, Norman served in the 27th Battalion. George played multiple instruments with the “Middle Sackville” and the “Westmorland and Kent Battalion'' bands. He was an active member of the Royal Canadian Legion from its formation in 1926, becoming the first member to receive a Life Membership from them. George died on April 30, 1952, at the Lancaster Military Hospital in Saint John, New Brunswick.

Margaret 'Marcie' (Morice) Fullerton

  • MC-53
  • Person
  • 1920-2015

Margaret Elizabeth “Marcie” (Morice) Fullerton was born on 25 February 1920 in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick to John Wright Morice (1902-1981) and Edith (Campbell) Morice (1901-1972). She was educated in local schools and graduated from the Middle Sackville Superior School. She later attended the Mount Allison Commercial College where she completed her certificate in secretarial studies in 1937. A lifelong resident of Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. Marcie was the secretary to five Mount Allison University presidents between 1945 and 1986 including: George J. Trueman, W.T. Ross Flemington, Bill Crawford, Laurence Cragg, and Guy MacLean. She married Charles Russell Fullerton (1923-2007) on April 24, 1943 and the couple had one child, David Fullerton. Marcie was President and founder of the Sackville branch of The Business and Professional Woman’s club. Marcie had a passion for collecting textual records and photographs pertaining to the history of Sackville. She died in Saint John, New Brunswick on 11 April 2015. She is interred in the Westcock Cemetery in Westcock, New Brunswick.

Oulton Family

  • MC-51
  • Family
  • 1905-1937

Edward Chandler Oulton was born approximately 1874 in Baie Verte, Westmorland County, New Brunswick and died September 29, 1942 in Saint John, New Brunswick. He was the brother of Jennie Oulton, Mary Ellen (Oulton) Frizzel, Phoebe Jane (Oulton) Cadman, Major Hiram Oulton, Minnie Tresa (Oulton) Hunter, William Ernest Oulton and Frederick Burton Oulton and the son of Jonathon Oulton and Julie Ann Tucker. Edward Chandler Oulton’s brother Jonathan Oulton was a farmer, so it is possible Edward Chandler took over or worked on the family farm. A J.M. Oulton owned property in Sackville near where the Main Street Baptist Church stands today.

Richard Lowerison

  • MC-32
  • Person
  • 1809-1875

Captain Richard Lowerison was born in Aulac, Westmorland County on April 22, 1822. At age 35 on December 29, 1857, he married Mary Keillor, daughter of Thomas Coates Keillor (1788-?) and Mary Jones (1799-?). Richard and Mary had 4 children between 1859 and 1868: Alice Bertha Lowerison, Elmore Harold Lowerison (MD), Mabel Mary Aravessa (Horace Ellsworth Fawcett), and Ethel Ellen Lowerison. Census and ship records confirm that the Captain worked as a Master Mariner and ship owner from 1839 to some time between the last ship record (1873) and the first census report where his occupation is listed as retired (1881). Throughout his time as a Master Mariner, he owned shares in many locally built ships, and frequently did business with close friend and notable Dorchester, New Brunswick ship builder, Gideon Palmer. He moved to Amherst in 1872 and spent several years in retirement then took up the position of Registrar or Probate in Amherst, Cumberland County, Nova Scotia in approximately 1892. Captain Lowerison died January 29, 1904 in Cumberland County.

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