Showing 2166 results

Authority record

Calder, Doris Ethel (Patterson)

  • 1
  • Person
  • 1941-

Doris Ethel Calder (née Patterson) is a resident and historian of the Kingston Peninsula. She was born on November 3rd, 1941, and currently lives in the Patterson family home in Long Reach with her husband, John. Both her mother, Winnifred Ethel Crawford, and her father, George Gordon Patterson, are direct descendants of Loyalist settlers.
Calder is as an authority of local history with a natural gift for storytelling. This disposition can be traced back to her childhood, when she would tell stories to captivated peers in the woodshed behind her school. Much of the rest of her childhood was spent working and playing on the family farm.

After high-school, Calder left the Peninsula for a few years. She graduated from Acadia University in 1963 and received a B.Ed. at the University of New Brunswick the following year. In 1964, she married John Calder. The young couple then embarked on an adventure, hitch-hiking through Europe and Africa, where they worked and explored. When the grand tour came to an end, Doris and John settled in Long Reach, where they have remained ever since, serving as keen-eyed witnesses to patterns of life and their generational transformations.

In addition to being an oral historian, Calder is the author of All Our Born Days: A Lively History of New Brunswick’s Kingston Peninsula (Percheron, 1984). All Our Born Days is the definitive account of life on the Peninsula. This book stems from more than forty-five interviews conducted by Calder, documenting the memories of local residents.

Ingersoll, Lincoln Keith

  • CA GMA MG2
  • Person
  • 1914-1993

Lincoln Keith Ingersoll was born June 30, 1914 at Grand Manan, N.B.. He married Ruby Cronk and had three children. After his military tour of duty as a dentist, he returned to Grand Manan and sought many professions. He became a teacher and Principal of the Grand Manan High School. During this time he wrote of the history of Grand Manan and was instrumental in fundraising and the creation of the Grand Manan Museum directly across the street from the school where it would always be easily accessible for Grand Manan students. He was a member of the Canadian Museum Association. He held the position as Curator, Dept. of Canadian History at the New Brunswick Museum from 1969-1972. Then he moved to Fredericton where he worked extensively on the Bicentennial Commission and other historically significant projects.
He was a prolific letter writer and kept much of his correspondence with the responses back and forth so the entire story would be preserved. His held many different offices and worked in various professions while on Grand Manan and in Fredericton, including: fish plant manager, bookkeeper; Canada Savings Bond Representative; Secretary, Grand Manan Telephone company, office of the High Sheriff, Justice of the Peace; Board of Health, sub-registrar, insurance salesman, political life, Conservative Party, military life (Dental Technician Class'41), principle Grand Manan High School, Grand Manan Museum curator, writer for Royal Canadian Geographic, newspaper correspondent for many local papers. Some of his volunteer interest included: Grand Manan Historical Society - president, Grand Manan Board of Trade - president, Canadian Legion of the British Empire Service League - secretary/treasurer, prospecting licence, Grand Manan High School Cadet School Leader, Boy Scouts Association leader, Genealogist and Biography writer, public speaker.
He gave lectures to many different groups for retiring school employees, public events, and specialty group functions. He was always promoting the history of Grand Manan and the importance of sharing that history with others through education and preservation. He wrote manuals and policy documents to assist with the development of these organizations. His work was recognized across the country and he gave speeches across Canada to Annual Meetings of Provincial-level organizations. Through these many careers and adventures L. Keith Ingersoll received many awards and recognition. Shortly before his death he was notified that he was the recipient of the Order of Canada. Sadly he did not live to accept this honour personally, and his son Granville, accepted the medal at the ceremonies in Ottawa. He died December 16, 1993 in Fredericton, NB. There is a large display in his memory at the Grand Manan Museum.

Grand Manan Historical Society

  • CA GMA MG23
  • Corporate body
  • 1931-

The Grand Manan Historical Society, Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, was formed in 1930 under the aegis of Buchanan Charles and was incorporated in 1931. In 1934, the first "Grand Manan Historian" was published by Mr. Charles and the Society as a commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the settlement of Grand Manan. When the organization re-grouped in the 1970's L.K. Ingersoll was the President for many years. Wade Reppert followed in his path for 27 years, retiring in the early 2000's. Future presidents have reduced their years of service and shared the responsibility.

The publication of the "Grand Manan Historian" became the main focus of the Society. It publishes Grand Manan related original works and republishes the many existing reports and essays concerning the Island, its fishery, its geology, its flora and fauna, and its insular way of life.

The Grand Manan Historical Society, together with the Grand Manan Museum Inc., support the Grand Manan Archives. By 2019, 29 issues of "Grand Manan Historian" have been published. The Seal Cove sandbar has been preserved as the Seal Cove Seawall National Historic Site. The Society worked to preserve the area through owning and restoring wharves surrounding the area. Upon completion of the work, the society liquidated the asset to interested parties. The creation of an art gallery for the preservation of the art of Grand Manan in the Historical Society building was accomplished and then turned over to a group of artists able to take the Gallery to the next level. Gleneta Hettrick retired as Archivist in 1998, when Ava Sturgeon filled her position. The Archives continues to receive grants from the Council of Archives of New Brunswick to pursue its work.

Hof, Alice Mayo

  • CA GMA MG6
  • Person
  • 1873 - 1962

Alice Mayo Hoff is the widow of Brigadier General Samuel Hof, Former Master General of the Ordnance United States Army. They were married on May 1, 1900 and they had one daughter together. She passed away in 1962, at the age of 89

Ingersoll, Eunice Lenora

  • Details of Eunice's life are included in the research notes created by Natalie Urquhart, a relative of Eunice.
  • Person
  • 1878-1938

Eunice Lenora Ingersoll was born 21 August 1878 to James and Wealtha Ingersoll, in Seal Cove, Grand Manan, NB, Canada. Eunice went to McLean Hospital, Waverly, Massachusetts, USA to study nursing. She lived and worked away from her home for a long time. Though engaged twice she never married. Eunice became ill with breast cancer and came home to live with her sister, Stella in Seal Cove. She died on December 15, 1938 and she is buried in the Old Seal Cove Cemetery with no headstone.

McAndrew Glover, Laura

  • Laura McAndrew Glover Letters and Ephemera
  • Person
  • 1945-1947

Laura McAndrew was born in 1917 to Robert McAndrew and Ellen (possibly Nellie) Morrison. She joined the Canadian Woman's Army Corp (Founded in 1941) and served overseas.
She married Ralph Glover in 1946. They had several children. Laura died in January of 2006, and Ralph died in May 2008.

The Lawson Family

  • Lawson Family Postcards
  • Family
  • 1910-1922

A collection of postcards sent to Alice Eliza Lawson from various family members.

Alice Eliza Lawson (Nee Stephen) was born on 6 July 1868 in Gloucester England to Andrew J Stephen and Eliza Layton. She moved to Canada with her family when she was 3 (circa 1871.) Several of her siblings were born in Canada. On 20 June 1888, she married Brunswick Arthur Lawson. They had four children, Andrew William (1889-1916) George Brunswick (1892-1916) Alice Eliza (1896-1970) Lucinda Bella (1901-1974), and Mary Delphina Florence (1908-2002.) Her sons, Andrew and George died months apart in Europe during the First World War. Alice died 20 June 1933, the 45th anniversary of her marriage to Brunswick, who outlived her passing 10 October 1942.

A.E. Wry Standard Manufacturing Company

  • MC-10
  • Corporate body
  • 1902-1939

Albert Edward (A.E.) Wry was born in Sackville, New Brunswick on March 23, 1864 to James Wry and Charlotte T. Kay. He married Emma J. Richardson on June 5, 1889, in Sackville, New Brunswick. He died on November 30, 1945, at the age of 81, and is buried in Sackville, New Brunswick. The A.E. Wry Standard Manufacturing Company came into existence as an amalgamation of three local companies located in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick: the Ayer Boot & Shoe Company (Acquired by A.E. in 1902), the Abner Smith Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes (Acquired by A.E. in 1903), and A.E Wry’s own company, A.E. Wry & Co. Harness (founded in 1896). Prior to starting his own company, Albert Edward Wry had been a long-time employee of J. R. Ayer. Wry’s business became known as the Standard Manufacturing Company by 1906. In 1914, the shareholders of the Standard Manufacturing Company and A. E. Wry Limited, the two main branches of this industry, combined their efforts to form A.E Wry - Standard Ltd. This company was the largest of its kind in Canada, manufacturing boots and shoes, moccasins and shoe packs, harnesses of all types, and various types of leather. They were also jobbers of saddlery, hardware, leather, Saskatchewan robes and coats, sheepskin coats, trunks, bags, and other things. The date that the A.E Wry - Standard Ltd. Company officially closed its doors has not been determined, though in 1939 the property was acquired by the J. L. Black Company after their main store and warehouse burned down.

James and Abner Smith

  • MC-16
  • Family
  • 1844-1854, [1880-?], 1887-1890.

James Smith was born in MacDuff, Scotland on 18 March 1793 and died in Sackville, New Brunswick on 16 August, 1865. He married Isobell Bruce in 1815 and had eight children with her, one of them being Abner Smith (1835-1904), born in Shemogue, New Brunswick. Isobell died in 1842 in Shemogue, New Brunswick. James later married Abigail Peirse in Amherst, Nova Scotia in 1845. During the first half of the 19th century, James Smith manufactured harnesses, boots, and shoes, and by the 1850s his was one of at least seven tanneries located in Middle Sackville. Abner carried on his father’s large-scale boot and shoe operation and in 1865 he established Abner Smith’s Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. The company remained active for thirty-seven years until it was purchased by the Standard Manufacturing Company organized by A. E. Wry in 1903 (renamed A. E. Wry Standard, Ltd in 1914).

Enamel and Heating Products Ltd.

  • MC-21
  • Corporate body
  • 1852-2012

The Fawcett Foundry was opened in 1852 by John and Charles Fawcett on the corner of Main and King Streets in Sackville, New Brunswick as a small tin shop producing stoves. The establishment of the Intercolonial Railway in 1869 allowed the foundry to expand because it gave them a way to ship goods worldwide.
In December of 1893, the original building was destroyed by a fire but was rebuilt in February of 1894. The costs associated with the rebuilding affected employees’ salaries causing a strike later in 1894. Though not free of difficulty, the early twentieth century marked the Foundry’s shift from its beginnings as a tin shop to a wartime materials manufacturer to the enamel stoves and sanitaryware manufacturing for which it became known.
With the business success from World War 1, Fawcett Foundry underwent a rebranding to Enamel & Heating Products Ltd. in 1928. That same year they expanded into Amherst, Nova Scotia with Plant #2, then the next year, Victoria, British Columbia where they bought out the Albion Iron Works Company, Plant #3. Their expansion also allowed Enamel and Heating to keep up with exporting their products internationally, which was increasingly commonplace in the 1930s. They exported to countries including New Zealand, Argentina, and South Africa. Sackville, New Brunswick, alongside the Fawcett Foundry, Plant #1, remained the company headquarters and was under the direction of Dr. Norman A. Hesler. Hesler helped lead the Fawcett rebranding and reorganization, and he served as President and Managing Director of Enamel & Heating Products Ltd. for many years.
Enamel and Heating was very successful with a total countrywide workforce of 800, including 250 employees in Sackville. As well as the foundries they owned several branches including the Fundy and Chapman branches in New Brunswick and a Quebec branch. Representatives of Enamel and Heating presented at exhibitions across Canada – including the Hanrower Exhibition, exhibitions in Vancouver, British Columbia; St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador; Bridgewater and Halifax, Nova Scotia; and the Rand Show and Empire Exhibition in Johannesburg, South Africa.
The company was hit hard by the Depression, but World War II contracts helped keep the Sackville-based company alive. Enamel & Heating Products Ltd. devoted roughly 80% of its operation to fill war orders and even added a new building at their Sackville location to accommodate the increased production of aircraft parts, ammunition boxes, windlasses, and bilge pumps. In 1950 the company acquired the Canadian Car & Foundry Company in Amherst, Nova Scotia. After a year of operation under the name Atlantic Industries Limited, the company was fully absorbed into Enamel & Heating Products and became its Plant #4, housing both steel and aircraft divisions.
Due to changes in South African export policies, Lewis Appliance Corporation took over manufacturing of Enamel and Heating products to be sold in South Africa. The partnership with Lewis Appliances proved fruitful and Enamel and Heating, in conjunction with Lewis Appliances, hosted a contest for their Ellis de Luxe stove in South Africa in 1958.
In 1982 Enamel and Heating closed due to declining popularity of wood heating, the economy of the late 1970s, and competition from larger companies. The province bought out the assets of Enamel and Heating and their closest competitor Enterprise Foundry, also in Sackville, New Brunswick that went into receivership that same year. The old Enamel and Heating buildings were sold to Mount Allison University in 1986 for one dollar and demolished that June. A much smaller foundry opened on the old site of the Enterprise foundry and as an homage to both of the town’s foundries operated under the name Enterprise Fawcett Foundry Limited until its closing after a fire in 2012.

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