Showing 14 results

Authority record
Tantramar Heritage Trust

C.W. Fawcett

  • MC-72
  • Person
  • 1910

Charles Wetmore (C.W.) Fawcett was born on June 6, 1874, in Sackville, New Brunswick, to Charles and Catherine (Wetmore). He married Mary Medina Chapman on January 27, 1909, in Westmorland, New Brunswick and they had four children. He died on February 16, 1954, at the age of 79. His father Charles Fawcett founded the Charles Fawcett Manufacturing Company in Sackville, New Brunswick in 1852. Long known as the Fawcett Foundry, the company was renamed Enamel & Heating Ltd. in 1928 after the acquisition of foundries in Amherst, Nova Scotia and Victoria, British Columbia. The foundry in Sackville became known as Plant #1, but was still known locally as the Fawcett Foundry. They manufactured a wide variety of stoves, furnaces, and hot water heaters. When C.W. Fawcett’s father died in 1907, he and his brother Horace took over responsibility as President and Vice President of the company, with C.W. Fawcett holding the latter position.

James and Abner Smith

  • MC-16
  • Family
  • 1844-1854, [1880-?], 1887-1890.

James Smith was born in MacDuff, Scotland on 18 March 1793 and died in Sackville, New Brunswick on 16 August, 1865. He married Isobell Bruce in 1815 and had eight children with her, one of them being Abner Smith (1835-1904), born in Shemogue, New Brunswick. Isobell died in 1842 in Shemogue, New Brunswick. James later married Abigail Peirse in Amherst, Nova Scotia in 1845. During the first half of the 19th century, James Smith manufactured harnesses, boots, and shoes, and by the 1850s his was one of at least seven tanneries located in Middle Sackville. Abner carried on his father’s large-scale boot and shoe operation and in 1865 he established Abner Smith’s Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. The company remained active for thirty-seven years until it was purchased by the Standard Manufacturing Company organized by A. E. Wry in 1903 (renamed A. E. Wry Standard, Ltd in 1914).

Margaret 'Marcie' (Morice) Fullerton

  • MC-53
  • Person
  • 1920-2015

Margaret Elizabeth “Marcie” (Morice) Fullerton was born on 25 February 1920 in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick to John Wright Morice (1902-1981) and Edith (Campbell) Morice (1901-1972). She was educated in local schools and graduated from the Middle Sackville Superior School. She later attended the Mount Allison Commercial College where she completed her certificate in secretarial studies in 1937. A lifelong resident of Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. Marcie was the secretary to five Mount Allison University presidents between 1945 and 1986 including: George J. Trueman, W.T. Ross Flemington, Bill Crawford, Laurence Cragg, and Guy MacLean. She married Charles Russell Fullerton (1923-2007) on April 24, 1943 and the couple had one child, David Fullerton. Marcie was President and founder of the Sackville branch of The Business and Professional Woman’s club. Marcie had a passion for collecting textual records and photographs pertaining to the history of Sackville. She died in Saint John, New Brunswick on 11 April 2015. She is interred in the Westcock Cemetery in Westcock, New Brunswick.

A.E. Wry Standard Manufacturing Company

  • MC-10
  • Corporate body
  • 1902-1939

Albert Edward (A.E.) Wry was born in Sackville, New Brunswick on March 23, 1864 to James Wry and Charlotte T. Kay. He married Emma J. Richardson on June 5, 1889, in Sackville, New Brunswick. He died on November 30, 1945, at the age of 81, and is buried in Sackville, New Brunswick. The A.E. Wry Standard Manufacturing Company came into existence as an amalgamation of three local companies located in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick: the Ayer Boot & Shoe Company (Acquired by A.E. in 1902), the Abner Smith Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes (Acquired by A.E. in 1903), and A.E Wry’s own company, A.E. Wry & Co. Harness (founded in 1896). Prior to starting his own company, Albert Edward Wry had been a long-time employee of J. R. Ayer. Wry’s business became known as the Standard Manufacturing Company by 1906. In 1914, the shareholders of the Standard Manufacturing Company and A. E. Wry Limited, the two main branches of this industry, combined their efforts to form A.E Wry - Standard Ltd. This company was the largest of its kind in Canada, manufacturing boots and shoes, moccasins and shoe packs, harnesses of all types, and various types of leather. They were also jobbers of saddlery, hardware, leather, Saskatchewan robes and coats, sheepskin coats, trunks, bags, and other things. The date that the A.E Wry - Standard Ltd. Company officially closed its doors has not been determined, though in 1939 the property was acquired by the J. L. Black Company after their main store and warehouse burned down.

Sackville Harness Shop

  • MC-23
  • Corporate body
  • 1919-2020

The Sackville Harness Shop was founded in 1919 by Aretus C. Anderson, Albert Anderson, J. L. Dixon, Frank W. Fullerton, Clarence Griffin, and William W. Ward. However, according to an interview from Rural Heritage magazine in 2000, a long-time employee Paul Blakeny noted that his father, Arthur Blakeny was also one of the founders of the Harness Shop. Arthur and several others were employees of the old A. E. Wry Standard (another harness manufacturer), and Paul said that they were not satisfied with their conditions so they went on strike, and left to start the Sackville Harness Shop in 1919. The building that housed the shop from 1920 onwards was built in Sackville, New Brunswick by Samuel Freeze Black (1806-1880), the uncle of the prominent Sackville merchant Joseph L. Black, in 1846. After the founding owners, the Harness shop was owned by the Estabrooks brothers Bob, Bonar, Louis, and Bill and there were six employees. Bill Long began working at the shop in 1978 (after being laid off from a job at Moloney Electric). Bill Long was hired as a collar maker in 1978. He trained under the master craftsman/collar-maker, Jack McKenzie, who himself trained under one of the founders, Clarence Griffin. Long purchased the business in 1991 and retired in May 2021, ending approximately 30 years of ownership and 101 years of the business operation. The Harness Shop was well-known for their handcrafted leather harnesses and their handmade straw collars (which was one of the Harness Shop’s signature products). The shop had expanded into other areas, including making belts, bags, and jingle bell straps, as well as selling other leather goods and horse care products. At the time of the shop’s closure (and for many years prior), the Sackville Harness Shop was the only manufacturer of handmade straw collars in North America and of hand-made horse tack. The shop also had some notable customers over the years, including making a 34 inch collar for the world’s (allegedly) biggest and heaviest horse in Washington state; collars for the Budweiser Brewery Clydesdales team in St. Louis Missouri, USA; and collars for the Carlsberg Brewery Belgians Team in Toronto, Ontario.

Anderson, Job

  • MC-4
  • Person
  • 20 January 1838 - 1910

Job Anderson was born in 1839 in Midgic, Sackville, Westmorland, New Brunswick to John Anderson (1798–1866) and Elizabeth Read (ca. 1800–1891) and was the great-grandson of the Yorkshire family of Thomas and Mary Anderson, who arrived in Sackville in 1772. Job Anderson married Emma R. Harris on 30 March 1864 and they had two children: Nellie (1868- n.d.) and Fred (1883-n.d.). Their daughter Nellie married Walter W. Tingley, who moved to the property in 1907. This property stayed in the Tingley family for another 80 years. Job Anderson was both a farmer and generalist blacksmith, shoeing horses and making items for local farmers. The blacksmith shop that belonged to Job Anderson was inactive for many decades before being moved to the Campbell Carriage Factory Museum in 2011 to become a functioning blacksmiths shop. Job Anderson died in Sackville, New Brunswick, in 1910.

Burwash Robinson General Store and Tannery

  • MC-70
  • Corporate body
  • circa 1902 to 1960s

Alfred Burwash Robinson was born on August 6, 1874, in Shediac, New Brunswick, to John Mathias Robinson (1823-1887) and Jane Amos (1838-1912). He died in 1969 in Sackville, New Brunswick. He is buried next to his wife Margaret I. Cook (1871-1939) at the Four Corners Upper Sackville Cemetery.
Burwash opened a general store in 1902-1903, adding a post office at the same location shortly afterwards. Burwash lived nearby in a small house near Harper Lane (now 352 Main Street, Middle Sackville) and was assisted by his son-in-law George Creasy. He operated a grocery store in 1927 and owned and operated a tannery, but the dates of operation for this latter business are uncertain. The tannery was located on Donald Harper Lane. All of Burwash’s businesses were located in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. Although it is unknown how long Burwash operated the general store and post office, it is known that in the 1950’s Burwash’s son-in-law George Creasy was the chief operator. The vacant Burwash Robinson General Store and Post Office building was torn down in 2004.

Marion Carter

  • MC-62
  • Person
  • 1928-Living

Marion Carter was born in 1928 in Frosty Hollow, New Brunswick (just outside of Sackville), the first of three daughters. She lived on her family’s farm until she moved to Kirk Street in Sackville, New Brunswick on October 31, 1988. She attended Frosty Hollow School until grade 8, after which she attended Allison High School in Sackville. After graduation, Marion attended the Secretarial program at Mount Allison’s Commercial College. Upon completion, on June 28th, 1945, she began working as a secretary in payroll and purchasing under President Frederick Fisher at the Enterprise Foundry in Sackville, New Brunswick. Marion eventually headed this department. In 1976, she became head of the Personnel Department which had originally been handled by the Payroll department. Marion worked with many personnel at the foundry over her career (which at its height had over 400 employees) and due to the nature of her positions she knew all of the employee’s names. Her duties included sitting in on the negotiations of contracts between the foundry’s lawyer and the union leaders. When the Enterprise Foundry went into receivership for the second time in 1983, she went to work at Lockwood for the last ten years of her career and retired in 1993.

George Rogers

  • MC-56
  • Person
  • 1867-1952

George Leban Rogers was born December 16, 1867 in Westcock, New Brunswick to John Rogers, who had emigrated from Scotland, and his wife Emily Lawrence. George was christened at St. Anne's Anglican Church, British Settlement, New Brunswick. From his early teens through his adulthood he lived on the shores of Morice’s Mill Pond, later known as Silver Lake, in Sackville, New Brunswick. George married his first wife Priscella Estabrooks on February 26, 1890. Priscella was born on September 14, 1872, and died in 1905 at 33 years of age. Together, they had seven children: Norman, George W., Marguerita, Hazel, John “Jack”, Clinton “Ted”, Picard “Pick” Hamilton, and Charles B. In 1902, the family moved to the old Beal residence located on the edge of Morice’s Mill Pond (Silver Lake). George continued to live in the house for the rest of his life with his youngest son Abner G. Rogers. After Priscella died in 1905, George was left with seven children, but two years later, he married Flossie Estabrooks (Priscella’s younger sister) on April 24, 1907. George and Flossie had five children together: Edith P., Dexter C., Herman, Donald F., and Abner G.. Flossie died in 1944 after she was hit by a truck in Middle Sackville. George worked for 64 years at the Campbell Carriage Factory as a master wheelwright, wagon, carriage, and sleigh manufacturer in Sackville, New Brunswick. He first appears on the payroll of the Carriage Factory on December 1, 1884, shortly before he turned 17 and continued to work at the Carriage Factory until his 81st year and was one of the factory’s last two employees. George temporarily left the factory in 1916 to enlist in the 145th Regiment in Moncton, New Brunswick. He served overseas in the latter part of WWI with his sons, Jack and Clinton in the 145th Battalion, while his other son, Norman served in the 27th Battalion. George played multiple instruments with the “Middle Sackville” and the “Westmorland and Kent Battalion'' bands. He was an active member of the Royal Canadian Legion from its formation in 1926, becoming the first member to receive a Life Membership from them. George died on April 30, 1952, at the Lancaster Military Hospital in Saint John, New Brunswick.

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