Showing 19 results

Authority record
New Brunswick

Burwash Robinson General Store and Tannery

  • MC-70
  • Corporate body
  • circa 1902 to 1960s

Alfred Burwash Robinson was born on August 6, 1874, in Shediac, New Brunswick, to John Mathias Robinson (1823-1887) and Jane Amos (1838-1912). He died in 1969 in Sackville, New Brunswick. He is buried next to his wife Margaret I. Cook (1871-1939) at the Four Corners Upper Sackville Cemetery.
Burwash opened a general store in 1902-1903, adding a post office at the same location shortly afterwards. Burwash lived nearby in a small house near Harper Lane (now 352 Main Street, Middle Sackville) and was assisted by his son-in-law George Creasy. He operated a grocery store in 1927 and owned and operated a tannery, but the dates of operation for this latter business are uncertain. The tannery was located on Donald Harper Lane. All of Burwash’s businesses were located in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. Although it is unknown how long Burwash operated the general store and post office, it is known that in the 1950’s Burwash’s son-in-law George Creasy was the chief operator. The vacant Burwash Robinson General Store and Post Office building was torn down in 2004.

C.W. Fawcett

  • MC-72
  • Person
  • 1910

Charles Wetmore (C.W.) Fawcett was born on June 6, 1874, in Sackville, New Brunswick, to Charles and Catherine (Wetmore). He married Mary Medina Chapman on January 27, 1909, in Westmorland, New Brunswick and they had four children. He died on February 16, 1954, at the age of 79. His father Charles Fawcett founded the Charles Fawcett Manufacturing Company in Sackville, New Brunswick in 1852. Long known as the Fawcett Foundry, the company was renamed Enamel & Heating Ltd. in 1928 after the acquisition of foundries in Amherst, Nova Scotia and Victoria, British Columbia. The foundry in Sackville became known as Plant #1, but was still known locally as the Fawcett Foundry. They manufactured a wide variety of stoves, furnaces, and hot water heaters. When C.W. Fawcett’s father died in 1907, he and his brother Horace took over responsibility as President and Vice President of the company, with C.W. Fawcett holding the latter position.

Enamel and Heating Products Ltd.

  • MC-21
  • Corporate body
  • 1852-2012

The Fawcett Foundry was opened in 1852 by John and Charles Fawcett on the corner of Main and King Streets in Sackville, New Brunswick as a small tin shop producing stoves. The establishment of the Intercolonial Railway in 1869 allowed the foundry to expand because it gave them a way to ship goods worldwide.
In December of 1893, the original building was destroyed by a fire but was rebuilt in February of 1894. The costs associated with the rebuilding affected employees’ salaries causing a strike later in 1894. Though not free of difficulty, the early twentieth century marked the Foundry’s shift from its beginnings as a tin shop to a wartime materials manufacturer to the enamel stoves and sanitaryware manufacturing for which it became known.
With the business success from World War 1, Fawcett Foundry underwent a rebranding to Enamel & Heating Products Ltd. in 1928. That same year they expanded into Amherst, Nova Scotia with Plant #2, then the next year, Victoria, British Columbia where they bought out the Albion Iron Works Company, Plant #3. Their expansion also allowed Enamel and Heating to keep up with exporting their products internationally, which was increasingly commonplace in the 1930s. They exported to countries including New Zealand, Argentina, and South Africa. Sackville, New Brunswick, alongside the Fawcett Foundry, Plant #1, remained the company headquarters and was under the direction of Dr. Norman A. Hesler. Hesler helped lead the Fawcett rebranding and reorganization, and he served as President and Managing Director of Enamel & Heating Products Ltd. for many years.
Enamel and Heating was very successful with a total countrywide workforce of 800, including 250 employees in Sackville. As well as the foundries they owned several branches including the Fundy and Chapman branches in New Brunswick and a Quebec branch. Representatives of Enamel and Heating presented at exhibitions across Canada – including the Hanrower Exhibition, exhibitions in Vancouver, British Columbia; St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador; Bridgewater and Halifax, Nova Scotia; and the Rand Show and Empire Exhibition in Johannesburg, South Africa.
The company was hit hard by the Depression, but World War II contracts helped keep the Sackville-based company alive. Enamel & Heating Products Ltd. devoted roughly 80% of its operation to fill war orders and even added a new building at their Sackville location to accommodate the increased production of aircraft parts, ammunition boxes, windlasses, and bilge pumps. In 1950 the company acquired the Canadian Car & Foundry Company in Amherst, Nova Scotia. After a year of operation under the name Atlantic Industries Limited, the company was fully absorbed into Enamel & Heating Products and became its Plant #4, housing both steel and aircraft divisions.
Due to changes in South African export policies, Lewis Appliance Corporation took over manufacturing of Enamel and Heating products to be sold in South Africa. The partnership with Lewis Appliances proved fruitful and Enamel and Heating, in conjunction with Lewis Appliances, hosted a contest for their Ellis de Luxe stove in South Africa in 1958.
In 1982 Enamel and Heating closed due to declining popularity of wood heating, the economy of the late 1970s, and competition from larger companies. The province bought out the assets of Enamel and Heating and their closest competitor Enterprise Foundry, also in Sackville, New Brunswick that went into receivership that same year. The old Enamel and Heating buildings were sold to Mount Allison University in 1986 for one dollar and demolished that June. A much smaller foundry opened on the old site of the Enterprise foundry and as an homage to both of the town’s foundries operated under the name Enterprise Fawcett Foundry Limited until its closing after a fire in 2012.

George Rogers

  • MC-56
  • Person
  • 1867-1952

George Leban Rogers was born December 16, 1867 in Westcock, New Brunswick to John Rogers, who had emigrated from Scotland, and his wife Emily Lawrence. George was christened at St. Anne's Anglican Church, British Settlement, New Brunswick. From his early teens through his adulthood he lived on the shores of Morice’s Mill Pond, later known as Silver Lake, in Sackville, New Brunswick. George married his first wife Priscella Estabrooks on February 26, 1890. Priscella was born on September 14, 1872, and died in 1905 at 33 years of age. Together, they had seven children: Norman, George W., Marguerita, Hazel, John “Jack”, Clinton “Ted”, Picard “Pick” Hamilton, and Charles B. In 1902, the family moved to the old Beal residence located on the edge of Morice’s Mill Pond (Silver Lake). George continued to live in the house for the rest of his life with his youngest son Abner G. Rogers. After Priscella died in 1905, George was left with seven children, but two years later, he married Flossie Estabrooks (Priscella’s younger sister) on April 24, 1907. George and Flossie had five children together: Edith P., Dexter C., Herman, Donald F., and Abner G.. Flossie died in 1944 after she was hit by a truck in Middle Sackville. George worked for 64 years at the Campbell Carriage Factory as a master wheelwright, wagon, carriage, and sleigh manufacturer in Sackville, New Brunswick. He first appears on the payroll of the Carriage Factory on December 1, 1884, shortly before he turned 17 and continued to work at the Carriage Factory until his 81st year and was one of the factory’s last two employees. George temporarily left the factory in 1916 to enlist in the 145th Regiment in Moncton, New Brunswick. He served overseas in the latter part of WWI with his sons, Jack and Clinton in the 145th Battalion, while his other son, Norman served in the 27th Battalion. George played multiple instruments with the “Middle Sackville” and the “Westmorland and Kent Battalion'' bands. He was an active member of the Royal Canadian Legion from its formation in 1926, becoming the first member to receive a Life Membership from them. George died on April 30, 1952, at the Lancaster Military Hospital in Saint John, New Brunswick.

Grand Division of the Sons of Temperance Midgic, New Brunswick

  • MC-69
  • Corporate body
  • 1910

The Temperance movement formed to make the consumption of alcohol illegal. The Canada Temperance Act (Scott Act) of 1878 gave local governments the option to ban the sale of alcohol. The Cookeville-Midgic Women's Institute Hall in Midgic, New Brunswick, is believed to have been a Temperance meeting place. Midgic, is a rural community just north of Sackville in Westmorland County, New Brunswick, Canada.

Guptill, Dr. Ernest Wilmot

  • Person
  • 1919-1976

Dr. Ernest Wilmot Guptill was born September 5, 1919 to Arthur E. Guptill and Hope Reade at Grand Harbour. He received his early education at the Grand Harbour School. His family moved to Wolfville, N.S. when he and his two siblings were of college age.

Ernest completed his BSc at Acadia University in Wolfville, his MSc at the University of Western Ontario and his PHD in Physics at McGill University in 1946.

He married Miriam MacKay and they had four children: Douglas, Larry, Fred, and Mary. The family moved to Halifax when he was appointed the assistant professor of the Physics Department at Dalhousie University. In 1958 he became the George Monroe professor of Physics and Department Head, serving as head for 10 years. During his 10 years at the department he established a superbly equipped laboratory and gained the admiration of colleagues and students alike. His most important work was in nuclear magnetic resonance, acoustics and low temperature research. But he is probably most remembered by his students as a much loved, respected and creative teacher.

His “Slotted Array” co-invented with W. H. Watson, resulted in nine patents on a radar device now used on commercial vessels. This provided much higher resolution radar which contributed to successes of Allied Air Forces operating in Europe.

Guptill was an experienced sailor who tragically died in a boating accident, 20 March 1976.

Hartland Bridge Company

  • Corporate body
  • 1898 - Unknown

The Hartland Bridge Company was founded in 1898 by a delegation of men from both sides of the St. John river who had petitioned the government to build a bridge at Hartland but were denied. The company sold bonds to fund the building of the bridge, and bridge builder Charles McCormack was elected President of the company and later the superintendent of the building of the Hartland bridge. After construction had finished the company continued to operate, running a toll both on the bridge and conducting and overseeing repairs.

Intercolonial Railway

  • MC-59
  • Corporate body
  • 1872-1918

The Intercolonial Railway (ICR) was the first infrastructure project of the Dominion of Canada and linked Nova Scotia and New Brunswick to Upper and Lower Canada fulfilling a demand of the Maritime provinces to join Confederation. The first ICR train arrived at the Sackville, New Brunswick station on December 2, 1869, although the entire government owned rail system was not completed until 1872. The ICR moved goods, mail, and passengers between the many new towns and cities and gave the central provinces access to the seaboard and opened the larger interior markets to the Maritimes. In 1919 the Canadian government combined the ICR with five other railways making it into one national company, the Canadian National Railway.

James and Abner Smith

  • MC-16
  • Family
  • 1844-1854, [1880-?], 1887-1890.

James Smith was born in MacDuff, Scotland on 18 March 1793 and died in Sackville, New Brunswick on 16 August, 1865. He married Isobell Bruce in 1815 and had eight children with her, one of them being Abner Smith (1835-1904), born in Shemogue, New Brunswick. Isobell died in 1842 in Shemogue, New Brunswick. James later married Abigail Peirse in Amherst, Nova Scotia in 1845. During the first half of the 19th century, James Smith manufactured harnesses, boots, and shoes, and by the 1850s his was one of at least seven tanneries located in Middle Sackville. Abner carried on his father’s large-scale boot and shoe operation and in 1865 he established Abner Smith’s Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. The company remained active for thirty-seven years until it was purchased by the Standard Manufacturing Company organized by A. E. Wry in 1903 (renamed A. E. Wry Standard, Ltd in 1914).

Margaret 'Marcie' (Morice) Fullerton

  • MC-53
  • Person
  • 1920-2015

Margaret Elizabeth “Marcie” (Morice) Fullerton was born on 25 February 1920 in Middle Sackville, New Brunswick to John Wright Morice (1902-1981) and Edith (Campbell) Morice (1901-1972). She was educated in local schools and graduated from the Middle Sackville Superior School. She later attended the Mount Allison Commercial College where she completed her certificate in secretarial studies in 1937. A lifelong resident of Middle Sackville, New Brunswick. Marcie was the secretary to five Mount Allison University presidents between 1945 and 1986 including: George J. Trueman, W.T. Ross Flemington, Bill Crawford, Laurence Cragg, and Guy MacLean. She married Charles Russell Fullerton (1923-2007) on April 24, 1943 and the couple had one child, David Fullerton. Marcie was President and founder of the Sackville branch of The Business and Professional Woman’s club. Marcie had a passion for collecting textual records and photographs pertaining to the history of Sackville. She died in Saint John, New Brunswick on 11 April 2015. She is interred in the Westcock Cemetery in Westcock, New Brunswick.

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