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Authority record

Alberton-Elmsdale Pastoral Charge

  • Corporate body
  • 1829 -

A pastoral charge is a grouping of churches termed "preaching points" -- each with separate names and governing boards or sessions. These churches are served by one minister. The pastoral charge title usually reflects the breadth of the geographic area encompassing the charge.

Alberton-Elmsdale Pastoral Charge is on Prince Edward Island. Preaching points are at Alberton (Gordon Memorial) and Elmsdale.

Presbyterian ministers were visiting the Alberton area as early as 1826. In 1829, Presbyterian families in Alberton petitioned Prince Edward Island Presbytery for regular supply and William McGregor began to visit the area twice year, covering five Sundays. In 1831, 14 families decided to organize themselves into a distinct pastoral charge and construction of a church began in that same year with the exterior of the building being completed in 1833. By 1835, the church building was in use. The first settled minister to the charge was Rev J.C. Sinclair who arrived in 1843. Construction began on a larger building in 1854 but it was destroyed by fire just before completion and construction began on a new building (The Old Dock Church) was completed in 1856.

In 1865, West Cape, Brae, and Campbellton separated from Alberton to form a new congregation. Almost 20 years later, in 1881, Montrose, Elmsdale, and Tignish separated from the congregation at Alberton to become a separate pastoral charge.

The first Presbyterian church in Montrose was built in 1885. There was also a Methodist church across the river from the present side. Anticipating church union, the Methodist Church was sold to the Anglicans, whose church had burned, in 1924. The Presbyterian Church became the United Church building in 1925. That church building burned in May 1944 and a new building was opened on November 11, 1945. Regular services in the church ended in 1969 with services being held a couple of times in the summer.

In 1859, the Methodists in Bedeque recommended that Rev Robert Wilson, a missionary, be sent to the area along the coast between West Cape and North Cape, A year later, the area was formed into the Elmsdale Methodist Mission with Rev. William C. Brown overseeing 13 preaching places. In 1863, the West Cape Methodist Circuit, as it was then known, was divided with a separate preacher being procured for Cascumpec, Kildare, and Tignish. In 1870, the West Cape Methodist Circuit was renamed Alberton Methodist Circuit. From 1902-1925, West Devon which is now part of O'Leary Pastoral Charge was part of the Alberton Circuit. At the time of church union, Alberton Methodist Circuit contained the appointments of Alberton, Montrose, Miminigash, Cascumpec, and West Devon.

Elmsdale became part of the Alberton Methodist Circuit in 1870. Land for construction of a Methodist church in Elmsdale church was obtained in 1880 and a church was built in 1884. The next year the Presbyterian Church purchased the church building from the Methodists.
A church was built in Cascumpec in 1872.

The church in Miminegash began as a Bible Christian preaching station in 1836 and construction was started on a chapel on Lot 7 in 1845. In 1881, both the Bible Christians and the Methodists built new churches. The two denominations were merged into one in 1884. Twelve Bible Christian families went to the Presbyterian Church and the Bible Christian building was used by them until it was sold in 1916.

A church was built in Campbellton circa 1862. Until that time, the Methodist families in Campbellton walked to West Point to church (22 kilometers).

In 1925, the Congregational, Methodist and most Presbyterian Churches were united into one denomination -- the United Church of Canada. Upon church union, Montrose Pastoral Charge contained the preaching points of Elmsdale, Campbellton, Miminegash, and Montrose and Alberton Pastoral Charge consisted of the preaching points of Cascumpec, Tignish, and Alberton. The Methodist church in Alberton was moved to another lot and became the church home of the Presbyterians who did not enter union. The Old Dock Church was moved to the former site of the Methodist Church and became Alberton United Church.

In 1966, Alberton and Montrose Pastoral Charges united to share a minister. This worked so well that the charges amalgamated on 1 July 1969. In 1970, the congregations at Alberton, Montrose, and Cascumpec united to become known as Gordon Memorial and Elmsdale, Miminegash and Campbellton became known as Elmsdale. The Alberton Church is designated "Gordon Memorial" in honour of missionaries to New Hebrides (Erromanga) -- the Reverends George N., and wife Ellen, and James D. Gordon who were martyred.

A union church of Episcopalian, Baptist, Presbyterian, and Methodists was opened in 1861. Twenty years later the Presbyterians joined the pastoral charge of Montrose and Elmsdale and a building was constructed in 1893 on land donated by Mrs. Elizabeth Haywood. Upon church union, Tignish became part of Alberton Pastoral Charge. The building was sold to the Village of Tignish on 5 December 1972 to be used as a museum. In 1979 the village sold the church.

Albion Steam Works (Nashwaaksis, N.B.)

  • Corporate body
  • Founded in 1836

Albion Steam Works was founded in 1836 in Nashwaaksis, New Brunswick, across the St. John River from Fredericton. Co-founders William Braithwaite and William P. Kay, originally doing business as Braithwaite, Kay and Company, combined a variety of business ventures to form the firm. They constructed a brewery, oat and flour mills, a smithy and a cooperage, machinery for garding (gardening or farming), a shop to turn wood and iron, circular sawing for joiners work, facilities to cut hay and straw and for bruising oats. All the company's machinery was run by steam engines. In fact, the owners' primary intention was to open a general engineering firm to serve as an outlet for the sale of steam engines and mill machinery.

In addition, Albion Steam Works operated a general mercantile business. Albion Store sold a variety of imported products, as well as locally produced goods, such as pork, fish, stoves, vinegar, grain, flour, beer, coal, and plaster of Paris. The Works also offered architectural design services, which included estimates for building construction. This work was probably completed by co-founder William Porden Kay, who, in the 1840s and 1850s, would be employed as a colonial architect by his uncle, the governor of Tasmania, to design a number of public buildings there. Merchants John V. Thurger and Robert Chestnut served as company agents in Saint John and Fredericton respectively. In July 1837 the firm expanded when a store opened on upper Queen Street, Fredericton, with Anthony Lockwood as agent. A drying kiln and a barley mill were added in September of the same year.

The services of Albion Steam Works were in demand in the late 1830s. These records suggest that the volume of business increased to the point that the firm acquired the schooner "Mary Ann" to transport raw materials upriver and end products to market. The ledgers contain a number of accounts pertaining to the provisioning of the "Mary Ann". The date Albion Steam Works ceased operation is unknown.

Sources: Daniel Johnson's Vital Statistics from New Brunswick Newspapers on-line; MC248; and other records.

Alcock, F. J.

  • Person

F. J. Alcock (1948) mapped the geology of Grand Manan and the adjacent islands. Alcock's pioneer work clearly delineated the principle features of the bedrock geology of Grand Manan.

All Saints Anglican Church

  • Corporate body
  • 1788-

It was British policy in the 18th century to support every colony with the establishment of a Church of England. The government agency responsible for this policy was called The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (SPG).

Rev. Dr. Samuel Cooke was sent by the SPG to Saint John, NB in 1785. Rev. Cooke visited St. Andrews and described the Town as, “…a regularly laid out town of 200 houses with a good safe harbour and fine country around it”. With financial support from the SPG, the Church of St. Andrews was constructed on Church Lane in the Town of St. Andrews.

In 1788 the Church opened its doors to all denominations as a place of worship. The first resident clergyman, Rev Samuel Andrews, served the community between 1786 and 1818. By 1821 with the support of Rev. Cooke, the Church of St. Andrews vestry acquired 1,591.5 acres of glebe land of which 57.75 acres were town lots.
Although the Presbyterians withdrew in 1819, the Church continued to serve the broader Christian community until 1826. The SPG replacement for Rev. Andrews was Dr. Jerome Alley, who served the Parish from 1819 until 1858. During his 39 year tenure, the Church of St. Andrews was re-consecrated All Saints Church in 1826. Additionally, Dr. Alley was responsible for the construction of the Chapel of Ease of Saint John the Baptist in Chamcook, N.B. The Chapel was consecrated by Bishop Medley of Fredericton July 16, 1846 and continues to serve the Parish to this day. By the end of Dr. Alley’s ministry in 1858 the SPG had withdrawn grants from foreign parts and the Church began to rely on income from pew rental, contributions from parishioners, and profits from glebe rentals.

In 1867 a new church was constructed on King Street under the supervision of Rev. W. Q. Ketchum, who served as rector until 1901. The church was originally designed to be constructed of stone but Walter Mansfield Buck, Chief Engineer of the New Brunsick & Canada Railway, revised the plans and proposed a wooden framed building after it became apparent that the Parish could not afford a stone building.

The current minister is the venerable Archdeacon Rev. John Matheson.

All Saints Church (St. Andrews, N.B.)

  • Corporate body
  • Established ca. 1786

St. Andrews, New Brunswick, was settled by Loyalists in 1784. In 1786, the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel assisted the Rev. Samuel Andrews, a Church of England priest and Loyalist from Connecticut, to come to St. Andrews as a missionary. With the guidance of Andrews, the people in the settlement built a church, which, while it belonged to the Church of England, was intended to include all the Protestants of the community. It was named All Saints Church but was always known locally simply as the Church of St. Andrews.

The colonial government provided nearly all the money, and construction was completed in 1790. Internal furnishings were privately funded. In 1846 a chapel-of-ease, built at Chamcook and called St. John's Chapel, was consecrated by John Medley, Bishop of Fredericton. The Rev. Andrews remained in the parish until his death in 1818. He was succeeded by Jerome Alley, from 1819 to 1858, and William Ketchum, from 1858 to 1900. By 1867, the community had grown and other Protestant denominations had built their own churches. A new and larger church, known by its official name of All Saints Church, was constructed, which has served the Anglican community ever since.

Allaby, Eric

  • Person
  • b. 1943

A survey of underwater historical resources was conducted by Eric Allaby of Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick from 1973 to1976. It was a joint venture between the New Brunswick Museum and the Nova Scotia Museum to provide a comprehensive and careful survey of shipwrecks along Maritime provincial coastlines. Data collected during the survey were analyzed and an assessment of the feasibility of a full scale archaeological project was made. Reports and artifacts from New Brunswick ships were deposited in the New Brunswick Museum and those from Nova Scotia in the Nova Scotia Museum. Work was conducted year round; in the summer, field work in coastal waters and in the winter, planning and analysis of data.

Eric Allaby, (b. 1943) was the chief investigator on this survey. He is a graduate of Acadia University with a B.Sc. in physics. He began his diving career in 1960. In 1961, he took part in a survey of Louisburg Harbour and attended underwater archaeology conferences in Mexico in 1964 and in Toronto in 1965. From 1964 to 1968, Eric Allaby was diving full-time. He designed and built a successful airlift used on wrecks in the Bay of Fundy. He then designed and helped build a one-man submarine for explorations to depths of 400 feet.

A Ford Foundation grant enabled Eric Allaby to pursue the study of shipping and shipwrecks. His research at Lloyds, the National Museum at Greenwich, the Public Record Office and other repositories in London, England in 1971 was published as an extensive, indexed list of shipping casualties in the Atlantic provinces. Eric Allaby has also been an active in community affairs on Grand Manan Island and is, in 2002, a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick, representing the Fundy Isles. Eric Allaby is a consultant and a commercial diver.

Allaby, Eric

  • Person
  • 1943-

Eric Allaby was born August 7, 1943, on Grand Manan Island, he graduated from Grand Manan High School and Acadia University (B.Sc., 1964). He became a teacher and worked as a diver. A Ford Foundation fellowship enabled him to research maritime history in North America and England. He was an underwater archaeologist with the National Museums of Canada (1973- 1976) and a founding member of the North American Society for Oceanic History. He has written several books and articles on marine history, including Shipbuilding in the Maritime Provinces, The August Gale, two Grand Manan Historians on shipwrecks around Grand Manan Island, and Grand Manan. He is a marine artist and has exhibited his work around the province. First elected October 13, 1987, as the Liberal MLA for Charlotte-Fundy, he was on numerous committees. Re-elected September 23, 1991, and again in September 11, 1995, for the new riding of Fundy Isles. He chaired the government caucus (1997-1999). He was re-elected June 7, 1999, and served on several committees, and as Opposition House Leader. He was re-elected for a fifth term June 9, 2003. His riding of Fundy Isles was merged with the riding of fellow Liberal Rick Doucet to form Charlotte - The Isles in the 2006 redistribution of boundaries. As a result, Allaby chose not to seek re-election in the 2006 election. In 2007, he was named to the board of directors for the New Brunswick Provincial Capital Commission. Eric Allaby and his wife Berneta reside in Grand Manan, N.B. They have a son and a daughter.
Eric was the curator at the Grand Manan Museum and many of his sketches describing underwater archaeology around the Grand Manan Archipelago are on permanent display. This map shows Eric's love for sharing his knowledge with others and he has published many maps describing Grand Manan and her history.
Source: Biographies of Members, Legislative Assembly, New Brunswick, 55th Legislature, 2004.
Source: Wikipedia

Allan's Pharmacy

  • Corporate body
  • Operated until 1909

W.C. Rudman Allan was a druggist and chemist in Saint John, New Brunswick, and operated Allan's Pharmacy until 1909. He may have been related to Thomas Allan (died 1860), one of the founders of the New Brunswick Foundry.

Source:
Saint John and its Business, 1875;
New Brunswick Biographical Review, 1900

Allen (family)

  • Family
  • Branch begins no later than 1845

The Allen family were pioneers in the area of Port Elgin, New Brunswick. Reverend Thomas Allen and his wife Mary Eliza Allen (1845 -1932), had several daughters: Mary Edith, who was a teacher; Frances, wife of Theodore Goodridge Roberts; Ada E. (1881-1967); and Bertha, born 1881.

Results 21 to 30 of 1867