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Bliss family (Saint John)

  • Family
  • Branch begins in 1742

Jonathan Bliss (1742-1822), a lawyer from Massachusetts, was appointed Attorney-General of New Brunswick in 1785 and Chief Justice of New Brunswick in 1809. From 1791 to 1801 he was the business advisor of Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who lived in Saint John from about 1786 until he returned to England in 1791.

Jonathan Bliss was born in Springfield, Mass., the son of Rev. Samuel Bliss (1750-1803). He graduated from Harvard in 1763 and lived in Concord, Mass. He was a member of the General Court of Massachusetts in 1768 and was banished from the state in 1778. He was granted a townlot at Carleton in 1785 and became a Freeman of Saint John, New Brunswick, in 1785. He was admitted as an Esquire. He was appointed Attorney General of N.B. in 1784, was a member of the House of Assembly for St. John County in 1786, the Chief Justice for N.B. from 1808 to 1822 and President of the Privy Council. He died in Fredericton in 1822 and buried in the Old Burial Ground. His first wife, Mary, the daughter of the Hon. John Worthington of Springfield, Mass., died in Saint John in 1799, aged 39. His second wife was Sally, daughter of the Hon. Judge Upham. His children include: John Worthington (1791-1810); Lewis (1793-1882); William (1795-1874); and Henry (1797-1873).

His third son, William Blowers Bliss, married Sarah Ann Anderson, the adopted daughter of the Hon. Sampson Blowers, Chief Justice of Nova Scotia. Sampson Blowers was a good friend of Jonathan Bliss and the two had graduated from Harvard together in 1763. William Blowers Bliss was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia in 1834. William and Sarah's children were: Elizabeth Ann (1824-1901), who married the Hon. William Odell (1811-1891); Mary, who married the Rev. Hibbert Binney; another daugther, who married Bishop Kelly; and two sons.

Jonathan's son Henry Bliss was a lawyer and author in London, England.

Jonathan's son Lewis Bliss presented a chancel window to Trinity Church in 1880 as a memorial to the Bliss family.

Sources:
New Brunswick Loyalists, 1983;
Some Loyalists and Others, 1976;
Graves fonds, political biographies, 1960s

Borden - Bluck family (Sackville)

  • Family
  • 1850-1929

Byron Crane Borden was born on 27 November 1850 in Avonport, Kings County, Nova Scotia. He was the son of George Newton Borden (1816-1909) and Miriam Susanna Crane (1819-1882). He was educated at Acacia Villa School in Nova Scotia finishing in 1874. He began his university education at Mount Allison graduating in 1878 with a Bachelor of Arts. He completed his Masters of Arts in 1886 and received his Doctor of Divinity in 1893. He was ordained to the Methodist ministry in 1878 and first served in Bermuda where he met and married his future wife, Alice Susanna Bluck (1861-1935). After his two years in Bermuda Rev. Dr. Borden returned to Nova Scotia and served congregations at Arcadia, Yarmouth County and the Brunswick Street Methodist Church in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He was appointed the principal of the Mount Allison Ladies’ College in 1885 and served in that capacity for twenty-six years. That same year he became Professor of English Language at Literature at the University in which capacity he served until 1887. Thereafter, he served as the Professor of Political Economy and Constitutional. He also acted as the Dean of the Faculty of Theology. He was formally appointed as the fifth President of the University of Mount Allison College at a meeting of the Board of Regents on 19 April 1911. He assumed his new responsibilities in September of 1911 and continued in this role until his retirement in 1923. He received honorary degrees from King’s College (D.C.L.) in 1916, Acadia (LL.D.) in 1922, and Dalhousie (LL.D.) in 1924. He died at Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia on 17 July 1929. His funeral took place in the United Church in Sackville, New Brunswick and he was buried in the Sackville Rural Cemetery on York Street.

Alice Susanna Bluck was born at Hamilton, Bermuda on 2 December 1861. She was the daughter of William Bluck (1836-1904) and Harriet E.J. Cardy (1838-1875). She was educated in local schools and lived at Rosebank in Pembroke, Bermuda. She was married to Rev. Byron Crane Borden (1850-1929) on 17 June 1880. The couple had twin daughters: Elaine Allison Borden (Mrs. Frank Evans Dickie - 1887-1919) and Gladys Allison Borden (Mrs. Willard Roy Smith - 1887-1972). For many years she lived in apartments in the Mount Allison Ladies' College where her husband served as principal. In 1911, he was appointed president and they moved to the President's Cottage where they remained until 1923. They returned to Bermuda in retirement and lived in a cottage, "Thru-the-Land." They also maintained the Borden family home "Cranecroft" near Avonport, Nova Scotia. Subsequently, that property was sold and they moved to Annapolis Royal where there home was also named "Cranecroft" in order to be closer to their remaining daughter. She died in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia on 11 September 1935. She is buried in Sackville, New Brunswick.

Botsford family (Sackville)

  • Family
  • Branch begins 1744

Amos Botsford, the son of Bertha Bennett and Gideon Botsford, was born 31 January 1744 in Newtown, Connecticut. A graduate of Yale College in 1763, he studied law and practised in New Haven. In 1770 he married Sarah Chandler (1752-1820), and they had 3 children: Sarah, William, and Ann (nicknamed Nancy or Hannah). At the close of the American Revolutionary War, he emigrated with his family to what is now New Brunswick.

An original grantee of Parrtown (later Saint John), he eventually settled his family in Westmorland County, first on Dorchester Island and later at Westcock near Sackville. Botsford was appointed agent for the Lloyds Neck Associated Loyalists in 1782 and was sent to Nova Scotia to arrange for the settlement of Loyalist refugees. He also ran a large farm, practised law, and established a retail business. Active in provincial politics, Botsford ran successfully for a seat in the House of Assembly as a member for Westmorland County in the first general election in 1785. He was chosen the first Speaker of the House of Assembly, holding that post until his death in 1812. He was reelected to the House in the general elections of 1793, 1795, 1802, and 1809. He held several other prominent positions, including clerk of the peace, judge of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, and registrar of deeds for Westmorland County. Amos Botsford died at Saint John, N.B. on 14 September 1812.

Amos and Sarah's son William Botsford was born 29 April 1773 in New Haven, Connecticut. Educated at public schools, he received a bachelor of arts degree and a master of arts degree from Yale College in 1792 and 1796 respectively. He studied law in his father's office and also in the office of Jonathan Bliss in Saint John, N.B. In 1802 he married Sarah Lowell Hazen Murray, the widow of Thomas Murray; they had eight sons and one daughter.

William Botsford was admitted to the bar of New Brunswick in 1795. He practised law in Saint John, and was named deputy clerk of the Supreme Court and deputy registrar of the Admiralty Court in 1795. Eight years later he was appointed judge of the Vice-Admiralty Court, holding that position until 1808 when he relocated to Westcock. During his life, he held a number of other prominent posts, including recorder of the city of Saint John (1810-1815), solicitor general of New Brunswick (1816-1823), registrar of deeds for Westmorland Council (1812-1823), and judge of the Supreme Court of New Brunswick (1823-1845).

Like his father, he was involved in provincial politics, being elected to the House of Assembly as a member for Westmorland County in 1813. He was reelected in 1816, 1819, and 1820. In 1817 he was chosen Speaker of the House of Assembly. He resigned his seat in the House and his post as Speaker in 1823 to sit on the Executive Council. In 1832 he was named vice-president in the Court of Governor and Council for hearing causes relating to marriage and divorce. William Botsford died at his home in Westcock on 8 May 1864.

Bliss Botsford (1813-1890) was the seventh son of William Botsford. He was educated at King's College in Fredericton, studied law with William End of Bathurst and practiced in Moncton from 1836 to 1870 with an extensive civil and criminal practice. Bliss Botsford represented Westmorland in the House of Assembly as a Conservative in 1851-1854, 1857-1861, and from 1865 until 24 October 1870 when he was appointed to the bench. He served as a judge in the county courts of Albert, Westmorland and Kent. He was made surveyor general in 1865, a member of the Executive Council during the administration of Hon. Albert Smith, and Speaker from 1867 until 1870. Bliss Botsford married Jane, daughter of John Chapman of Cumberland, England in 1842. They had 4 children: Sarah married William Croasdale, a civil engineer from Moncton; Eliza married George Peters, son of Dr. George Peters of Saint John; Florence married Thomas Peters of Moncton; and Robert who be [Transcript of NBM's description is broken off here]

Brill family (Grand Lake)

  • Family
  • Branch begins in 18th century

Jacob Brill was born in Germany and settled in Dutchess County, New York. In 1783, he and his family and many of his neighbours, all Loyalists, took ship for Saint John, New Brunswick. Jacob later settled in the area of Grand Lake, Queens County.

Jacob Brill married Mary Smith and they had nine children -- Elizabeth married Isaac Smith, remained in the United States; Catherine married Stephen Thorne; Mary remained unmarried; Eleanor married Moses Pickard; Phoebe married Dow Vandine; Hannah married Samuel Burns; Joseph returned to the United States; David married Lydia Pickard in 1788; and Jacob married Hannah Jewett in 1788.

Jacob and Mary's son, David Brill, 1762-1848, was a young man when he arrived in New Brunswick in 1783 with his father. He married Lydia Pickard in 1788. In 1795, he became a captain of a company in the militia of Queens County. His brother, Jacob, was enlisted under his command.

David and Jacob shared a land grant of 200 acres in the Maquapit Lake area of Sunbury county which they acquired in 1786. Their brother, Joseph, also acquired a grant in the same area which he shared with John Snow. Joseph later returned to the United States.

Sources:
Marriages 1766-1888, Vol. 1, Sunbury County
Jack, D.R. , Loyalist Families of New Brunswick, Vol.1, A-C

Brown and Marr family (Quaco)

  • Family
  • Branch begins before 1832

The Brown family of West Quaco, New Brunswick, is descended from a William Brown (d. 1832) who came to Quaco from Nova Scotia. It is believed he was accompanied by family members including his brother, Joseph. The Browns were engaged in shipbuilding and other businesses. William Brown married Sarah Hamilton and their children included John M. Nelson, Ebenezer, James Edward, George and Caroline. John M. Brown married Joanna Cutten and they had the following children: William who married Rebecca Carson; Hamilton (Milton) who married Margaret Allen and settled in Brooklyn, N.Y.; Lavinia who married Thomas Carson; Sarah who married Thomas Brass Carson; Elisha J. who married Margaret Marr; and Omar P. who married Clara Bailey Marr in 1886.

First Elisha and then his brother, Omar, went to sea as captains with Tufts & Co. and Troop & Son of Saint John. They were married to sisters and their wives often accompanied them on voyages. During his career Omar was plagued with eye problems. One of his eyes was removed in Japan while he was captain of the "Lizzie C. Troop". In 1887 he developed problems with his remaining eye that forced him to leave his career as a ship's captain to open a general store in St. Martins. He returned to sea on the "Kate F. Troop" in 1900. Omar Brown died in 1915 and Clara Brown died in 1942.

Omar and Clara Brown had two sons, Douglas (b. 1888) married Bertha Augusta Rust of New York. They had no issue and returned to St. Martins from the United States on retirement. John (b. 1891) married Jean Parker of Winnipeg and had 3 children: Dorothy, Douglas, and Ronald. George Marr and his wife Margaret Robertson immigrated from Greenock, Scotland, to Saint John about 1825 and later moved to Quaco. Their children included Charles, Margaret, Catherine (remained in Scotland and married James Duncan of Crail) and John.

George Marr was a shipbuilder and was assisted by his son, John (1823-1904), who later became a ship's captain. John Marr married Sarah Brown, a daughter of Joseph Brown. Their children were Margaret who married Elisha J. Brown, Mary Rebecca who married Robert Carr, George who married Elizabeth Skillen, Clara Bailey who married Omar P. Brown, Alice, Emma who married Frank Mosher, John Duncan and 2 who died in infancy.

Buckingham family

  • Family
  • 1783 -

The Camp family were probably descended from Captain Abiathar Camp, a Loyalist who arrived in New Brunswick in 1783. They settled in Sunbury County, New Brunswick. Neil and Abigail Camp had 3 children, Mary, Hiel, and Calvin. Hiel died in 1811. Calvin married Hester Veits in July 1813. He died in 1829.

Mary wed Samuel Buckingham prior to 1804. She died in 1816 survived by a small child, possibly an infant, some other older children, and her husband. The Buckingham family lived in Oxford, Connecticut.

Sources: Early Marriage Records of New Brunswick; Hale, R. Wallace, Early New Brunswick Probate Records 1785-1835; and Arrivals 99 - Our First Families in New Brunswick, N.B. Genealogical Society, Saint John Branch, 1999

Bunker family (Rusagonis)

  • MS110
  • Family
  • 1826-1965

Three generations of the Bunker family of Rusagonis, New Brunswick including, Henry Bunker (1826-1885), Sherman S. Bunker (30 July 1853-2 Jan 1896)
and Zellan S. Bunker (1893-1965).

Bunting family (Saint John)

  • Family
  • Branch begins in 1785

The Rev. Joshua Bunting (1785-1869), son of New Brunswick Loyalist Roland Bunting, married Elizabeth Golding in 1818. They had 4 sons, William F., Charles Edward, Stephen Gerow, and W.D. Bunting. William Franklin Bunting (1825-1897) was often called Frank within the family. He was educated in Saint John at William Mills' school and at Jarvis William Hartt's high school. He became a clerk in the office of the city's collector of taxes in 1846 and remained in that office for over 40 years. Under a new assessment act in 1859, Bunting was appointed clerk to the newly-formed Board of Assessors. In 1882 another act created a permanent chairmanship of the Board to which W. F. Bunting was appointed until 1896 when he was removed and made an assessor.

Bunting was a member of the volunteer fire department of Saint John and served as foreman of a company for 14 years before the volunteer fire department was disbanded in 1864. He was active in the social, cultural and sporting life in the city, particularly with freemasonry, joining St. John Lodge No. 632 in 1852. He was active in Masonic politics until 1883 when his duties as Chairman of the Board of Assessors became too demanding. He wrote a book, published in 1895, on the history of the lodge in Saint John with sketches of all Masonic bodies in the province from 1784 to 1894. He also wrote a series of articles on the early government of Saint John for the "St. John Daily Sun" that were published between February and May 1888. He also published "The Encampment of Saint John" in 1892.

W.F. Bunting was also a member of the Polymorphian Society, a magistrate of the city and county of Saint John, and secretary of the Saint John Mechanics Institute between 1858 and 1864. He was an avid fisherman and hunter, was a member of the Saint John Baseball Club and the Pleasure Grounds Association, and was active in the founding of the Victoria Skating Rink and Club.

Brother Charles E. Bunting married Martha sometime in the early 1850s and had two sons. One son, Charles Jr., died in Saint John around 1857. In 1858, Charles and Martha; their surviving child, Willie; and Charles' brother, Stephen decided to move to California and boarded the "Visurgis". While en route Martha gave birth to a daughter, Annie, who died and was buried at sea. Martha died 11 days later and was buried in San Francisco when the ship landed.

In September 1859, Charles and Willie boarded another vessel which became unseaworthy near Samoa, in the South Pacific. They were forced to abandon ship and take to a raft. They eventually found passage on another ship which landed them in Sydney, Australia on 1 January 1860. They finally settled in Victoria B.C. where Charles become a member of Victoria City Council.

In 1864 Charles was remarried, to Jeannie, only daughter of Hugh McRoberts of Richmond Place, B.C. The same year, his son Willie died, at the age of 8. In 1861 Stephen married Maria Fuller of at Sacramento. They also moved to Victoria, where one son Francis, died.

Sources: Johnson, D.F. Vital Statistics from New Brunswick Newspapers, 1838-1858; McAlpine's Saint John City Directory, 1876-1877; Dictionary of Canadian Biography

Burditt, William Fotherby (family)

  • Family
  • Born in 1849

Merchant and entrepreneur, William Fotherby Burditt (1849-1931) was born on 30 May 1849, at Saffron-Walden, Essex, England, to the Rev. Thomas Burditt (1811-1881) and Anne Maria Fotherby Burditt (1817-1859), later of Tenby, South Wales. He had 6 siblings, namely, Thomas Henry (b. 1842), Anna Mary (1844-1939), George Deane (b. 1847), John Frederick (1851-1894), Eleanor (1855-1901), and Francis Noel (Frank, 1858-1940). William Burditt left Britain in June 1868 and settled in Saint John, New Brunswick. On 5 July 1870 he married Eliza Lury Duval, the daughter of school inspector Edmund Hillyer Duval. Seven of their children, William F. Burditt, Jr. (1873-1950), Mary Louise Burditt (Flewwelling, 1874-1948), Nellie Burditt (b. 1878), Arthur F. Burditt (1880-1970), Eleanor F. Burditt (1878-1947), and Edith Constance Burditt (1885-1975), reached adulthood.

From November 1870 to April 1874, William F. Burditt and his family lived in Nova Scotia, probably near Lawrencetown. They were living at Sackville, N.B., in July 1874, when Mary Louise (May) was born, but left there in November of the same year for Saint John. He was employed out of province for a couple of years and then returned to Saint John. He worked in partnership with Arthur P. Tippet under the firm name Arthur P. Tippet & Co. in the late 1870s and early 1880s. The business functioned as manufacturers' agents for the sale of fine salt, vinegars, soap, lard, oil, macaroni, and other foodstuffs. With Arthur P. Tippet, he co-founded the Saint John firm of Tippet, Burditt and Co. Ltd., in 1883, that sold agricultural implements and machinery, and he formed W. F. Burditt & Co. that sold similar merchandise (1890s). By the early 1920s, he was manager of the lumbering firm Frost and Wood Co. Ltd.

William F. Burditt's major contribution to Saint John was his guidance of the redesign of the city centre, and his creation of the new town plan. His models for civic systemization were widely copied throughout Canada. William F. Burditt served as vice-president of the Saint John Board of Trade and was active in the Saint John Exhibition Association. On invitation of the Canadian government, he attended the Centenary Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876. W. F. Burditt was a member of the Good Roads Association, the Natural History Society, the Saint John Art Club, the Fortnightly Club, the Free Kindergarten Association, and Germain Street Baptist Church. He also served as chairman of school trustees in East Saint John. William F. Burditt died at Saint John on 6 November 1931. His wife, Lury, predeceased him, passing away on 15 May 1928.

William F. Burditt's father was a Baptist preacher, who lived for many years at Tenby, Wales. His sister Anna Mary Burditt never married. She lived in Luton where she taught school, attended Park Street Baptist Church, and ran a book shop for many years in partnership with her brother, Frank Burditt. William F. Burditt's brother, John F. Burditt came to New Brunswick in 1869. He studied at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, graduating in 1877. He furthered his education at Newton Theological Seminary, Newton, Massachusetts. For a number of years, under the auspices of the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, he served in India and elsewhere. He died on 4 August 1894, in India, leaving a wife and 5 children, who probably made their home at Newtown, Massachusetts, following his death.

William F. Burditt's son, William F. Burditt, Jr., studied electrical engineering at the Pratt Institute, in New York, and mechanical engineering at Cornell University, graduating in 1898. He was employed by Prentiss Co., of New York; was proprietor of W. F. Burditt Machinery Company, New York City, in 1907; and became president of Loy & Nawart Co., of Newark, in 1912. In 1919, he co-founded Service Machine Co., of Elizabeth, New Jersey, retiring from the company in 1949. He married Katherine Adina Smith in 1902, and they had no fewer than 4 children, Katherine (Donaldson), Ruth B. (Thomas), Arthur K., and Allen G. and raised a foster son, Francis Mills. William F. Burditt, Jr. died 24 January 1950.

William F. Burditt's younger son, Arthur F. Burditt, married Lila Agnes White in 1918, and they had no fewer than 6 children: Alice Geraldine (b. 1919, m. MacLean), Albert William (b. 1921), George Dwight (1922-2012), Doris Duval (b. 1925, m. Hoar), Dr. Anna Mary (1929-2007), and Charlotte Evelyn (b. 1939, m. Sutherland). Daughters, Mary Louise (May) Burditt, Eleanor F. Burditt, and Edith C. Burditt remained in Saint John. Mary Louise married John Witcombe Flewwelling, a printer, on 20 June 1907. Eleanor F. Burditt, a nurse, died unmarried on 11 May 1947. Edith Burditt, a graduate of Acadia Ladies Seminary of Music, served as organist of the Edith Avenue Baptist Church (Saint John) for a number of years. She died unmarried at her residence on Bayside Drive on 11 July 1975, age 90.

Calling family (Woodstock)

  • Family
  • n.d.

Horace Victor Dalling was a Woodstock jeweler, optician, and owner of Dalling's jewelry store, which was located on Main Street, Woodstock, New Brunswick. He was the watch inspector for the Canadian Pacific Railway, and manufactured the first two telephones in Woodstock, which he placed in his store and in his home. Horace Victor Dalling was born in Richmond to Thomas (1820-1894) and Matilda (1825-1905) Dalling. His father was a Presbyterian farmer whose family had been in the area for nearly a century. In 1878, H. V. moved to Woodstock and established his business. In 1879, he married Mary Isabella McKilligan, daughter of John (1807-1890) and Catherine (1827-1908) McKilligan of Simonds. The couple lived on Richmond Street until 15 March 1910 when they moved into the Shea House at 106 Albert Street, Woodstock. Mrs. Dalling died on 7 June 1927. Mr. Dalling continued to run his store until 1929, when he retired because of ill health. His daughter, Edith, ran the store until his death on 9 January 1931.

H. V. Dalling and his wife had four children. The first, Clifford, was born on 4 March 1880. At some point he moved to Saskatchewan, where in Regina, he married Josie on 24 February 1908. On 15 December 1908, he left from Saskatoon and was never heard from again. On 19 March 1909, Josie moved to Woodstock, and on 21 June 1909, Josie and Clifford's son, Orville, was born. In May of 1917, Josie died from tuberculosis. Orville lived with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Dalling, for a time, then went to Orono, Maine, to live with the Shatney family. He was later married and had at least two children.

The second child of Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Dalling was Estella B., who was born on 5 November 1881. On 30 September 1907, Stella was married to Allison Osceola "Oley" Townsend, who, at one time, had been a Woodstock Fire Department employee. The couple lived on Maple Street in Woodstock until 28 August 1908. On 15 March 1907, Stella, with her mother, Mrs. H. V. Dalling, helped to establish the Woodstock Branch of the Rebekah Lodge No. 44. On 17 July 1911, Stella died of tuberculosis.

William Victor (“Billie”) Dalling was born to Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Dalling on 25 April 1885. In 1911, he left for Toronto to work with the large jewelry firm of Ryrie Bros. In February of 1915, he enlisted with the 13th C. F. A. No. 83473, and in May of that year, went with them to France. He was wounded there on 13 October 1916. After operations in England and Canada, he was in Fredericton waiting for his discharge when he contracted pneumonia. He died on 19 October 1918.

The youngest child of the Dalling family was Edith Pauline Dalling, who was born on 19 December 1888. She worked in her father's store and ran it after his retirement. She was active in the Presbyterian church, and sang in the choir. In August 1963, she suffered a stroke. Edith Dalling died in December of 1963.

H. V. Dalling and his wife had four children. The first, Clifford, was born on 4 March 1880. At some point he moved to Saskatchewan, where in Regina, he married Josie on 24 February 1908. On 15 December 1908, he left from Saskatoon and was never heard from again. On 19 March 1909, Josie moved to Woodstock, and on 21 June 1909, Josie and Clifford's son, Orville, was born. In May of 1917, Josie died from tuberculosis. Orville lived with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Dalling, for a time, then went to Orono, Maine, to live with the Shatney family. He was later married and had at least two children.

The second child of Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Dalling was Estella B., who was born on 5 November 1881. On 30 September 1907, Stella was married to Allison Osceola "Oley" Townsend, who, at one time, had been a Woodstock Fire Department employee. The couple lived on Maple Street in Woodstock until 28 August 1908. On 15 March 1907, Stella, with her mother, Mrs. H. V. Dalling, helped to establish the Woodstock Branch of the Rebekah Lodge No. 44. On 17 July 1911, Stella died of tuberculosis.

William Victor (“Billie”) Dalling was born to Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Dalling on 25 April 1885. In 1911, he left for Toronto to work with the large jewelry firm of Ryrie Bros. In February of 1915, he enlisted with the 13th C. F. A. No. 83473, and in May of that year, went with them to France. He was wounded there on 13 October 1916. After operations in England and Canada, he was in Fredericton waiting for his discharge when he contracted pneumonia. He died on 19 October 1918.

The youngest child of the Dalling family was Edith Pauline Dalling, who was born on 19 December 1888. She worked in her father's store and ran it after his retirement. She was active in the Presbyterian church, and sang in the choir. In August 1963, she suffered a stroke. Edith Dalling died in December of 1963.

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