Showing 1863 results

Authority record

Lewis Peter Fisher Memorial Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1911-1954

The L.P. Fisher Memorial Hospital opened in 1911, replacing the Carleton County Hospital in Woodstock, New Brunswick. When the hospital’s benefactor, Lewis Peter Fisher, died in 1905, he left a building, $10, 000 for capital changes, and a $20, 000 trust fund to cover maintenance costs of a hospital. All these bequests were to be made after his wife Mary’s death. When she died in 1910, the directors of the Carleton County Hospital inherited the Fisher family house. The governing board of the L.P. Fisher Memorial Hospital was formed and consisted of four trustees and three other individuals determined by the directors, the warden of Carleton County, and the mayor of Woodstock.

The L.P. Fisher Memorial Hospital allowed free admittance of all deserving poor. Renovations were made to the structure including the wiring and plumbing. The first floor contained the business office, men's and women’s wards, kitchen, operating room, and labor and case rooms. The second floor held eleven beds for patients and the third floor was the matron's and nurses’ quarters. In 1913, the hospital purchased its first x-ray equipment and, in 1915, purchased the first wheelchair. In 1926, the hospital purchased the residence of Mrs. T. I. Duncan to use as a nurses’ home. As the years passed, the hospital became inadequate to meet the needs of the people and standards set by the New Brunswick Hospital Act, the Canadian Hospital Association, and other agencies. The L.P. Fisher Memorial Hospital was torn down in 1954 to allow for the construction of a new hospital in Carleton County.

Lewis Peter Fisher Memorial School

  • Corporate body
  • 1911-

The Lewis Peter Fisher Memorial School began construction in Woodstock, New Brunswick, in 1911. The school's benefactor, Lewis Peter Fisher, a Woodstock attorney, died in 1905, leaving a will which provided for the construction of a public school, to begin after the death of his wife, Mary. Mrs. Fisher died in 1910.

The executors of Fisher's estate, Allison B. Connell and F.H.J. Dibblee, began working on the project of the memorial school in 1910, hiring architect G. Ernest Fairweather of Saint John. Fairweather began designing plans in 1910, planning a school which included a ground floor, second floor, and basement. Contractors Joseph MacVay and William MacVay were hired in 1911 for the sum of $52, 310. They completed construction in 1912.

Woodstock Standard Efficiency Club

  • Corporate body
  • 1916-1919

The Woodstock Standard Efficiency Club, established in 1916, was a boys' club which enabled young men, aged thirteen to nineteen, to participate in social and athletic activities on a membership basis. A constitution was written in 1917 to identify the administrative organization of the club. The ministers of the advisory committee, Reverend Hazel, Reverend Baird, Mr. Howard, Mr. Wiggins, and Mr. Wilson, were responsible for writing the rules, articles, and by-laws of the club. The club stayed open until the spring of 1919, when it was closed due to a lack of interest from the boys in the community.

Parrsboro-Port Greville-Advocate Pastoral Charge

  • Corporate body
  • [ca. 1827] -

A pastoral charge is a grouping of churches termed "preaching points" or "appointments," each with separate names and governing boards or sessions. These churches are served by one minister. The pastoral charge title usually reflects the breadth of the geographic area encompassing the charge.

Parrsboro-Port Greville-Advocate Pastoral Charge is located in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. Preaching points are at Parrsboro (Trinity United), Port Greville (Grace United), and Advocate Harbour (Advocate United).

In the early days of Methodism in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, Parrsboro was linked with Maccan in a circuit which covered over one hundred miles (including Parrsboro, Maccan, Maccan Mountain, West Brook, Amherst, Head of Amherst, Shinimiacas, Cross Roads, Woodstock, Diligent River, Fox River, New Canann, Advocate Harbour, and Five Islands).

When the Methodists built their first chapel in the Parrsboro area, probably around 1827, it was located about two miles from the town, its site now identified by the old Methodist cemetery. The manse was purchased in 1856. The first Methodist church in the town of Parrsboro was built on a lot purchased from Edward and Jonathan Vickery. The church was dedicated in June 5, 1859 and stood on the corner of Chapel and Spring Streets. The congregation soon outgrew this church and on August 1, 1897 a new building was dedicated.

Port Greville was originally known as Ratchford River. The name was changed to Port Greville in 1865. The Methodist Church in Port Greville was part of a circuit comprising Amherst, Maccan, Southampton, Parrsboro and Advocate. When settled ministry began in 1858, the circuit comprised Parrsboro, Diligent River and Port Greville. In 1894, the church building was moved to a new location. On May 24, 1898, the cornerstone of a new building was laid and it was dedicated on July 9, 1900. In 1899, Port Greville became a separate circuit with preaching points at Diligent River, Port Greville and Ward's Brook.

Advocate Methodist circuit was formerly part of the extensive Parrsbaro and Maccan circuit. In 1839, a Methodist Society was established in Advocate Harbour by Rev. William Wilson and meetings were held in the old school house. A site for a building was purchased in 1856 from Justice Bigelow of Cornwallis, and a church building was opened in 1858. Advocate became a separate circuit in 1867 consisting of Advocate Harbour, Spencer’s Island, Apple River, and Brookville. Allenville became part of the circuit in 1882, Fraserville in 1888, and New Salem in 1895. Brookville was moved to the Port Greville circuit in 1896. Regular services were also held at Cape d’Or from 1902-1907 but these were discontinued when the copper mine ceased to operate. In 1925, the Methodist Church became part of the United Church of Canada.

The cemetery at Advocate Harbour was in use from 1822-1876.

The Presbyterians were also active in Parrsboro and built a church in 1849. The congregation was known as St. James. Around 1881, the congregation began to raise funds for a new building. The foundation of the church was laid in 1882 and the new church building was dedicated on March 31, 1885. A church was also built at Diligent River on October 21, 1888.

In 1925, all Congregational and Methodist Churches in Canada united with a majority of Presbyterian Churches in Canada to create The United Church of Canada. A meeting to discuss the union of St. James’ Presbyterian and Grace Methodist was held in the August 25, 1925 of 1925 and a couple months later, the first congregational meeting of the Advocate Pastoral Charge was held on September 23, 1925. The congregation decided to use the former Methodist church as their meeting place. The new congregation was called Trinity United Church.

Port Greville Methodist Church also became part of the United Church in Canada in 1925 as its own Pastoral Charge. In 1948, Port Greville became part of the Parrsboro Pastoral Charge.
In 2005-2006, Advocate began a trial amalgamation with Parrsboro-Port Greville Pastoral Charge and eventually disbanded on December 31, 2009 to become part of Parrsboro-Port Greville-Advocate Pastoral Charge on January 1, 2010.

Advocate Pastoral Charge was located in Advocate Harbour in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. Historically the Pastoral Charge included preaching places at Allenville, Apple River, Fraserville, New Salem and Spencer’s Island.

In 1972, the six points on the Pastoral Charge were amalgamated to three (Advocate Harbour, New Salem, and Spencer’s Island) and services ceased at Allenville, Apple River, and Fraserville, United Church services ceased at Spencer’s Island Union Church in 2002.

A United Church congregation worshipped at Apple River Union Church from 1925 until 1972 when the six points on the Advocate Pastoral Charge were amalgamated to three (Advocate Harbour, New Salem, and Spencer’s Island), The church was sold on September 30, 1971.

Allenville was a preaching point on the Advocate Pastoral Charge from 1925 until 1972. Services continued here until May 1973 when the six points on Advocate Pastoral Charge were amalgamated to three (Advocate Harbour, New Salem, and Spencer’s Island)

A union church was erected in Fraserville on land deeded from William Grant in 1891. Participating denominations were Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist and Anglican. The deed was not registered until 3 July 1894 and the building was erected by builder George Crowe at approximately the same time. After 1925, Fraserville was part of the Advocate Pastoral Charge. Services ceased at Fraserville in 1972.

Southampton Pastoral Charge

  • Corporate body
  • 1874 -

A pastoral charge is a grouping of churches termed "preaching points" -- each with separate names and governing boards or sessions. These churches are served by one minister. The pastoral charge title usually reflects the breadth of the geographic area encompassing the charge.

Southampton Pastoral Charge is located in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. The one preaching point is at Southampton United. Former preaching points included New Canaan, Halfway River, and West Brook.

Southampton was originally part of the Parrsboro and Maccan circuit. In 1874, a new circuit appears under the name Maccan and Five Islands, and in 1877 the name was changed to Southampton. A new church was built at Southampton and dedicated on 7 November 1875.

The church in Athol was much older as a log church was built in 1819 on land which is now the Southampton-Athol cemetery. The deed of land for the building and church was purchased in 1821 from John Harrison. A new church was built in 1855.

In 1925, all Methodist and Congregational Churches and a majority of Presbyterian Churches in Canada were merged to create the United Church of Canada. At this time, the Southampton Pastoral Charge consisted of New Canaan, Halfway River, West Brook, Athol, and Southampton and Mapleton.

In the early years, Halfway River was associated with Parrsboro. Construction began on a meeting house in Halfway River in April 1865. This was built on land deeded to the four trustees of the Halfway River meeting house who represented the four denominations in the union: Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist, and Anglican. The resident ministers of that time of the church’s establishment were: Rev. Duncan McKinnon (Presbyterian), Rev. R. Tweedy (Methodist), Rev. M. Young (Baptist), and Rev. N.C. Custer (Anglican). These four denominations were all part of the Parrsboro charge of their respective denominations. Baptist and United Church services were held on alternate Sundays after 1925. Anglican services were discontinued at the church sometime prior to 1925. Baptist services were discontinued in 1964.

It is unknown when New Canaan (Canaan Mountain) church was begun as the deeds for the property were lost in a house fire. The congregation became part of The United Church of Canada in 1925 and eventually amalgamated with Southampton United in 1967. The church building was sold in 1971.

West Brook Church was built in 1867 as part of the Parrsboro-Maccan Methodist Circuit. In 1925, all Methodist congregations became part of The United Church of Canada. Regular services were held at West Brook until 1966.

In 1967, West Brook, Halfway River, and New Canaan amalgamated with Southampton United.

For many years, Mapleton United Church was connected with Southampton. In 1925, it was part of the Southampton Pastoral Charge. From 1976-2001, Southampton and Mapleton were known as Pioneer Pastoral Charge. In 2002, the churches separated to form individual pastoral charges.

Southampton amalgamated with Springhill on 29 January 2004 to become South Spring Pastoral Charge. This pastoral charge was disbanded in 2011 and Southampton and Springhill once again became separate pastoral charges.

Springhill: St. Andrew’s-Wesley Pastoral Charge

  • Corporate body
  • 1874 -

A pastoral charge is a grouping of churches termed "preaching points" -- each with separate names and governing boards or sessions. These churches are served by one minister. The pastoral charge title usually reflects the breadth of the geographic area encompassing the charge.

Springhill Pastoral Charge had preaching points at Springhill and prior to 1925 also a preaching point at Miller Corner.

Beginning in the 1840s, Springhill was an appointment on the Parrsboro Methodist Circuit. In 1858, a Methodist congregation was organized at Miller Corner and a church was built in 1863. Then, realizing that the town would be built farther to the east the building was sold and a new church was built at the corner of Princess and Main Streets in 1874. Springhill became a separate Methodist circuit in 1874. In 1882, it was felt that a more central location was needed and land was purchased and the church was moved to the present Main Street site. In 1913 this building was torn down and a new building erected and dedicated in 1914. It was named Wesley Methodist.

Another Methodist Church was built at Miller Corner in 1892. This church was known as the Athol Road Church.

In 1925, all Methodist and Congregational Churches and a majority of Presbyterian Churches in Canada were merged to create the United Church of Canada. Both Wesley Methodist Church and St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church joined The United Church of Canada.

On January 1, 1964, Wesley United Church and St. Andrew’s United Church amalgamated to become St. Andrew’s-Wesley United Church and used the former Wesley United Church as their home.

Southampton amalgamated with Springhill on 29 January 2004 to become South Spring Pastoral Charge. This pastoral charge was disbanded in 2011 and Southampton and Springhill once again became separate pastoral charges.

Mapleton Pastoral Charge

  • Corporate body
  • 1816 -

A pastoral charge is a grouping of churches termed "preaching points" -- each with separate names and governing boards or sessions. These churches are served by one minister. The pastoral charge title usually reflects the breadth of the geographic area encompassing the charge.

The Mapleton Methodist congregation came into being in 1816 when George Harrison, a layman, began holding regular services in the community. The congregation met in a school house until a new church was erected in 1855-1856. The church was built by Thomas Johnson and dedicated on 15 February 1857.

Mapleton is located in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. The town was originally known as Maccan Mountain but the name was changed to Mapleton in 1789. Mapleton was part of the Southampton Methodist Circuit and after the union which created The United Church of Canada in 1925, it became part of the Southampton Pastoral Charge. From 1976-2000, Southampton and Mapleton were known as Pioneer Pastoral Charge. In 2002, the churches separated to form individual pastoral charges. Mapleton Pastoral Charge has one preaching point: Mapleton United Church.

Cumberland Pastoral Charge

  • Corporate body
  • [1882] -

A pastoral charge is a grouping of churches termed "preaching points" -- each with separate names and governing boards or sessions. These churches are served by one minister. The pastoral charge title usually reflects the breadth of the geographic area encompassing the charge.

Cumberland Pastoral Charge is located in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. Preaching points are at Joggins and River Hebert (Trinity). Other historical locations within the bounds of the pastoral charge included Minudie, Strathcona, and Shulee.

The first Methodists in the area came from Minudie where a Rev. Pike introduced the community to Methodism. It eventually spread to River Hebert where a church was built in 1882. River Hebert was originally part of the Nappan Methodist Circuit but became the head of a circuit in 1886, including the preaching points of Shulee, Sand River, Head of River Hebert, and Joggins. A manse was built in 1900. In 1925, River Hebert Methodist Church united with St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church to become Trinity United Church.

Presbyterianism was introduced to the River Hebert area initially by Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter) missionaries – notably Rev. Alexander Clarke, who held services in River Hebert and Minudie. A Covenanter church was built in River Hebert in the late 1840s. Later, Scots Presbyterianism was brought to the region by Scottish settlers from Pictou County who settled in Minudie. Services were held in River Hebert on a sporadic basis until 1858 when meetings were inaugurated on a more regular basis. The original Covenanter movement did not prevail. The church building erected in 1889 in River Hebert and dedicated on September 22, 1889 may have combined both Scots and Irish streams. This church became known as St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. This pastoral charge also included the preaching points of Maccan, Minudie, and Joggins.

In 1925, all Methodist and Congregational Churches and a majority of Presbyterian Churches were amalgamated to form the United Church of Canada. At this time, Joggins Pastoral Charge included the preaching points of Joggins and Shulee. River Hebert Pastoral Charge consisted of the preaching points of River Hebert (Trinity United), Strathcona, and Minudie. By 1941, Strathcona was no longer listed as a preaching point and River Hebert Pastoral Charge and Joggins Pastoral Charge had amalgamated to form River Hebert-Joggins Pastoral Charge.

Cumberland Pastoral Charge was created in January 1995 with the amalgamation of Immanuel-Brookdale-Leicester Pastoral Charge and River Hebert-Joggins Pastoral Charge. The preaching points in this new pastoral charge were: Joggins, River Hebert, Immanuel (Amherst), Brookdale, Minudie, and Joggins. Minudie was dropped as a preaching point in 1995. In 2009, Brookdale was removed from Cumberland Pastoral Charge and became part of McCully Pastoral Charge and Immanuel (Amherst) became part of Northumberland Pastoral Charge.

Baie Verte-Port Elgin-Tidnish Bridge Pastoral Charge

  • [ca. 1818] -

A pastoral charge is a grouping of churches termed "preaching points" -- each with separate names and governing boards or sessions. These churches are served by one minister. The pastoral charge title usually reflects the breadth of the geographic area encompassing the charge.

A Methodist Church existed at Baie Verte prior to 1818, but the first regular services of a minister did not occur until 1818 when a church was built. A second church was built in 1839 and the present St. James Church was built in 1883. For many years, Baie Verte was part of the Point de Bute Circuit, but it became a separate circuit in 1860 that also included Bayfield. A church at Lorneville, Nova Scotia was part of the circuit and the church at Port Elgin was added in 1891.

Presbyterian work in the area commenced in Shemogue/Murray Corner in the late 1820s, under Rev. Alexander Clarke, Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). Clarke held services in Baie Vert and Port Elgin, beginning in the 1840s. Although no church was built in Baie Vert, a church was erected in Port Elgin, ca 1856 served by Rev. Alexander Robinson, also a Covenanter. Mainline Presbyterianism came after the 1875 union, and the Port Elgin church became a Presbyterian Church in Canada in 1876. In 1905, Joseph Howe Brownell, formerly a Covenanter, also became a minister of the Presbyterian Church in Canada in Port Elgin and Tidnish, serving until his death in 1920.
It is unknown when the church known as the Tidnish Bridge United Church building was built. Reformed Presbyterians began to hold meetings in this area in the late 1820s, under the direction of Revs. Alexander Clarke and William Darragh. In the 1880s, mainline Presbyterianism reappeared, ministers coming from Port Elgin; a chief one being Joseph Howe Brownell. With the formation of The United Church of Canada in 1925, the Presbyterian church in Tidnish became Tidnish Bridge United Church. The church was closed in the fall of 2003.
In 1925, the Methodist and Presbyterian churches in Baie Verte, Port Elgin and Tidnish were united to form the United Church of Canada Pastoral Charge of Baie Verte, Port Elgin and Tidnish.

Baie Verte (St. James) and Port Elgin (Trinity) are the two preaching places on this Pastoral Charge. They are located in Westmorland County, New Brunswick. Tidnish was a third preaching place associated with this Pastoral Charge. It is located in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. The church at Tidnish Bridge was closed in 2003.

The church at Port Elgin burned on November 20, 1955 and a new building was constructed 1956-1957.

Bayfield-Little Shemogue Pastoral Charge

  • Corporate body
  • 1860 -

A pastoral charge is a grouping of churches termed "preaching points" -- each with separate names and governing boards or sessions. These churches are served by one minister. The pastoral charge title usually reflects the breadth of the geographic area encompassing the charge.

The Baie Verte Methodist Circuit was formed in 1860 and Bayfield was one of the appointments in this circuit. Just over 10 years later, in 1872, a second minister came to live in the Bayfield section which included Port Elgin, Upper Cape, Cape Spear, and Cadman’s Corner. In 1880, Bayfield was made a separate circuit, consisting of Upper Cape, Cape Spear, and Cadman’s Corner. When the Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregational churches united to form the United Church of Canada in 1925, Bayfield Pastoral Charge contained the appointments of Bayfield, Upper Cape, Spence Settlement, and Cape Spear.

The first Methodist church in Bayfield was built in 1838. This building was replaced in 1888. The church at Upper Cape was built around 1838 as well. Later, a new church was built in Upper Cape and dedicated on August 21, 1892. The church at Cadman’s Corner was dedicated on October 7, 1894. A church at Cape Spear was erected in 1886.

In 1882, Colin and Lucinda Van Bushkirk sold their house to the Methodist Church to be used as a parsonage.

On October 16, 1894, a number of people met at the home of Jonathan Allen in Cape Spear to discuss the building of a Methodist church in the community. It is unknown when the building was erected but by July 3, 1895, the church had a trustee’s board. Cape Spear Methodist Church became Cape Spear United Church in 1925.

In 1925, Bayfield Methodist Circuit became part of The United Church of Canada. Bayfield Methodist Church became Wesley United Church and the Methodist church in Cape Tormentine became Trinity United Church.

The earliest Convenanter congregation in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia was established before 1830. Construction may have started on a church building as early as 1829 and the first communion service was held on July 3, 1831.

A Reformed Presbyterian congregation was organized by the Irish Synod in Shemogue in 1828. In the spring of 1830, construction began on a church building but the building was abandoned due to difficulties in obtaining a title to the property. A new building was started nearby in Murray Corner and the church was dedicated in 1831 by Rev. Alexander Clark.

In the early 1870s, it was decided to divide the district into two congregations. Consequently, a church was built at Chapman’s Corner in 1870 and a new church built at Murray Corner in 1872. In 1876, the minister of the Reformed Presbyterian Congregation in Shemogue along with 62 other people successfully petitioned the Presbytery of Wallace of The Presbyterian Church in Canada to allow them to be organized as the Congregation of Shemogue and Port Elgin of The Presbyterian Church in Canada. Chapman’s Corner remained a Reformed Presbyterian congregation but became a congregation of the Presbyterian Church in Canada in 1905. After this, a church was erected at Oulton’s Corner and became known as Zion Presbyterian.

The church at Murray Corner was destroyed by fire in the early 1920s and work commenced on a new building in 1922. The new church, which is now known as First Church, was dedicated on August 19, 1923.

In 1923, Rev. Leard, the minister of the Bayfield Methodist Circuit, suggested that he no longer serve Cadman’s Corner Methodist Church so the Little Shemogue Session agreed to take on the Cadman Corner congregation and evening services were held there.

The Bayfield-Little Shemogue Pastoral Charge is located on the eastern end of Westmorland County, New Brunswick. Preaching points include Bayfield (Wesley), Murray Corner (First), and Cape Tormentine (Trinity). Historic locations included, Little Shemogue, Cape Spear, Oulton's Corner, Cadman’s Corner, Chapman's Corner, and Upper Cape.

When the Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregational churches united to form the United Church of Canada in 1925, First Church, Zion Church, Port Elgin, and Tidnish became United Churches under two pastoral charges -- Bayfield and Little Shemogue. Bayfield Pastoral Charge contained the appointments of Bayfield, Upper Cape, Spence Settlement, and Cape Spear. The pastoral charge of Shemogue, Port Elgin, and Tidnish contained the preaching points of Oulton’s Corner, Tidnish, Murray, Corner, Chapman’s Corner, Cadman’s Corner, Port Elgin, and Shemogue. On July 1, 1927, Little Shemogue became a separate pastoral charge consisting of Murray Corner, Zion, Oulton’s Corner, Cadman’s Corner, Shemogue, and Chapman’s Corner. The church at Shemogue appears to have closed as a preaching place in 1953.

In June 1961 the two charges were united to form Bayfield-Little Shemogue Pastoral Charge consisting of the preaching points of Murray Corner, First Church, Bayfield, and Cape Tormentine. The churches in Upper Cape, Cape Spear, Cadman’s Corner, Chapman’s Corner, and Oulton’s Corner were closed around this time. The church in Spence Settlement was closed in 1963.

Results 11 to 20 of 1863